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High-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T (hs-cTnT) as a Predictor of Incident Diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleHigh-Sensitivity Cardiac Troponin T (hs-cTnT) as a Predictor of Incident Diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsWhelton SP, McEvoy JW, Lazo M, Coresh JJ, Ballantyne CM
Secondary AuthorsSelvin E
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume40
Issue2
Pagination261-269
Date Published2017 Feb
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAged, Atherosclerosis, Biomarkers, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prediabetic State, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, Troponin T
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Many individuals with prediabetes have evidence of subclinical myocardial damage and are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). If subclinical myocardial damage is independently associated with incident diabetes, this may contribute to the understanding of the association between diabetes and CVD. This study was conducted to determine whether high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) is associated with incident diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox models, we prospectively analyzed 8,153 participants without known diabetes or CVD. We used the Harrell C statistic to investigate whether hs-cTnT added incremental prognostic information for diabetes prediction.

RESULTS: During a median of 13 years of follow-up, there were 1,830 incident cases of diagnosed diabetes. After adjustment for demographics and traditional risk factors, participants with a baseline hs-cTnT of 9-13 ng/L or ≥14 ng/L had a significantly increased risk for diabetes compared to those with an hs-cTnT of ≤5 ng/L, with hazard ratios of 1.14 (95% CI 0.99-1.33) and 1.25 (95% CI 1.03-1.53), respectively (P = 0.018 for trend). Linear spline modeling that included adjustment for baseline fasting glucose suggested an increased risk of incident diabetes for participants with hs-cTnT levels >8 ng/L. Furthermore, the addition of hs-cTnT to fully adjusted models that included glucose significantly improved the prediction of incident diabetes from 0.7636 to 0.7644 (P = 0.023).

CONCLUSIONS: Participants with elevated hs-cTnT levels at baseline had an increased risk of incident diabetes, suggesting that the measurement of hs-cTnT may incorporate an underlying pathophysiologic overlap between diabetes and CVD not captured by other traditional risk factors. Measurement of hs-cTnT may be useful to identify individuals at an increased risk for incident diabetes and CVD in order to provide early and more intensive risk factor modification.

DOI10.2337/dc16-1541
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID28108537
PubMed Central IDPMC5250695
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007227 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States