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Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with incident peripheral artery disease among white and black adults in the ARIC study cohort.

TitleSerum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with incident peripheral artery disease among white and black adults in the ARIC study cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsRapson IR, Michos ED, Alonso A, Hirsch AT, Matsushita K, Reis JP
Secondary AuthorsLutsey PL
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume257
Pagination123-129
Date Published2017 02
ISSN1879-1484
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Biomarkers, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, United States, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency
Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations have been associated with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Prevalence of low 25(OH)D and PAD differ between whites and blacks. However, these associations have not been studied prospectively or in a population based cohort. We tested the hypothesis that low 25(OH)D is associated with greater risk of incident PAD in white and black adults.

METHODS: 25(OH)D was measured in serum collected at ARIC visit 2 (1990-1992). We followed 11,789 ARIC participants free of PAD at visit 2 through 2011 for incident PAD events. 25(OH)D (ng/mL) was categorized as deficient (

RESULTS: Over a mean follow-up of 17.1 years, 1250 incident PAD events were identified. 22% of whites and 61% of blacks were 25(OH)D deficient. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, the hazard ratio (95% CI) of PAD in participants with deficient versus sufficient 25(OH)D was 1.49 (1.26, 1.76). Inclusion of BMI, physical activity, and smoking status attenuated the association [1.25 (1.06, 1.48)]. The association between 25(OH)D and PAD was qualitatively stronger in blacks (p for interaction = 0.20).

CONCLUSIONS: Deficient 25(OH)D was associated with increased risk of PAD in black and white participants. Whether treatment of low vitamin D through supplementation or modest sunlight exposure prevents PAD is unknown.

DOI10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2017.01.016
Alternate JournalAtherosclerosis
PubMed ID28131046
PubMed Central IDPMC5369771
Grant ListR01 HL103706 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65226 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States