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Postprandial lipemia and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitlePostprandial lipemia and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsKats D, Sharrett ARichey, Ginsberg HN, Nambi V, Ballantyne CM, Hoogeveen RC
Secondary AuthorsHeiss G
JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Res Care
Volume5
Issue1
Paginatione000335
Date Published2017
ISSN2052-4897
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Excessive levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins during postprandial lipemia (PPL) have been reported to be atherogenic. However, it is unclear whether the degree of PPL independently predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD) given the scarcity of longitudinal data with standardised measures of postprandial change. We reexamined associations of PPL with incident CVD events in a population-based cohort using detailed measures of postprandial change from a standardised fat challenge.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Postprandial triglycerides, TG-rich lipoprotein triglycerides, retinyl palmitate and apolipoprotein B48 to B100 ratio were measured before (following a 12-hour fasting period) and after a fat-tolerance test meal in a middle-aged, biracial subcohort without CVD (coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke) from the community-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study in 1990-1993. Using these measures, we estimated associations of postprandial change with incident CVD (CHD, stroke) through 2012. Stratified analyses by race, obesity and carotid atherosclerotic severity were also conducted.

RESULTS: Of 559 participants, 127 (23%) developed CHD and 27 (5%) experienced a stroke over more than 20 years of follow-up. None of the measures of postprandial change were associated with incident CVD events in the overall sample, or by subgroups of race, obesity or carotid atherosclerotic severity (all p>0.3).

CONCLUSIONS: The degree of PPL was not shown to predict excess CVD risk in extended follow-up of a population-based sample. While our study is the largest to examine the association between PPL and incident CVD using standardised postfat challenge measures, prospective investigation with similar assessment of PPL in more powered samples is warranted.

DOI10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000335
Alternate JournalBMJ Open Diabetes Res Care
PubMed ID28191321
PubMed Central IDPMC5293824
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States