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Racial differences in periodontal disease and 10-year self-reported tooth loss among late middle-aged and older adults: the dental ARIC study.

TitleRacial differences in periodontal disease and 10-year self-reported tooth loss among late middle-aged and older adults: the dental ARIC study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsNaorungroj S, Slade GD, Divaris K, Heiss G, Offenbacher S
Secondary AuthorsBeck JD
JournalJ Public Health Dent
Volume77
Issue4
Pagination372-382
Date Published2017 Sep
ISSN1752-7325
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Aged, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Periodontal Diseases, Self Report, Tooth Loss, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate racial differences in the associations between periodontitis and 10-year self-reported incident tooth loss in a biracial, community-based cohort of US late middle-aged and older adults.

METHODS: Subjects were 3,466 dentate men and women aged 53-74 who underwent dental examinations from 1996 to1998. In 2012-2013, telephone interviewers asked participants about tooth loss in the preceding 10 years. Separate multivariable ordinal logistic regression models were used to calculate proportional odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as estimates of association between periodontitis and tooth loss for Whites and African-Americans (AAs).

RESULTS: The majority of participants were White (85 percent) and female (57 percent) with 23 teeth on average at enrollment. Approximately half the Whites (56 percent) and AAs (49 percent) had periodontitis. At follow-up, approximately 44 percent of AAs and 38 percent of Whites reported having lost ≥1 tooth. In multivariable models, severe periodontitis (OR = 3.03; 95% CI = 2.42-3.80) and moderate periodontitis (OR = 1.64; 95% CI= 1.39-1.94) were significant risk factors of incident tooth loss among Whites. For AAs, severe but not moderate periodontitis increased the odds of incident tooth loss (OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.37-3.59). In the final model, education was inversely associated with incident tooth loss among AAs, while lower income was associated with greater odds of tooth loss among Whites.

CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based cohort, there is racial heterogeneity in the association between periodontitis and tooth loss. Interventions to reduce the impact of periodontitis on tooth loss need to consider these differences.

DOI10.1111/jphd.12226
Alternate JournalJ Public Health Dent
PubMed ID28585323
PubMed Central IDPMC5718983
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DE011551 / DE / NIDCR NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States