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Sex Differences in the Association of Diabetes With Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Among African-American and White Participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleSex Differences in the Association of Diabetes With Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes Among African-American and White Participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsGeorge KM, Selvin E, Pankow JS, B Windham G
Secondary AuthorsFolsom AR
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume187
Issue3
Pagination403-410
Date Published2018 03 01
ISSN1476-6256
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Atherosclerosis, Cardiovascular Diseases, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Maryland, Middle Aged, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Abstract

A sex × diabetes interaction in cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been established among white persons; however, it is unknown whether this interaction occurs among African Americans. We hypothesized that there was a multiplicative sex × diabetes interaction for CVD among African Americans participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (1987-2013). Race-specific Cox models were run in three stages: Stage 1 examined baseline diabetes status; stage 2 examined baseline diabetes status with the competing risk of non-CVD death; and stage 3 examined time-varying diabetes status with a competing risk of non-CVD death. There were 1,073 incident CVD events among 3,767 African Americans and 2,475 among 10,291 white persons. Among African Americans, in stage 1 analysis, the hazard ratio for women with diabetes was 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0, 2.7) compared with women without diabetes after adjustment for age, and the corresponding hazard ratio for men was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.5, 2.1) (P for interaction = 0.014). After full adjustment, the diabetes hazard ratio was attenuated to 2.0 (95% CI: 1.8, 2.3) among women and remained 1.8 (95% CI: 1.5, 2.1) for men (P for interaction = 0.058). A synergistic influence on CVD risk between being a black woman and having diabetes was consistent across stage 2 and stage 3 analyses, with marginally significant interaction, mirroring sex differences seen in whites.

DOI10.1093/aje/kwx324
Alternate JournalAm J Epidemiol
PubMed ID29036484
PubMed Central IDPMC5860010
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005G / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007779 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States