Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Association Between Midlife Risk Factors and Late-Onset Epilepsy: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleAssociation Between Midlife Risk Factors and Late-Onset Epilepsy: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsJohnson EL, Krauss GL, Lee AK, Schneider ALC, Dearborn JL, Kucharska-Newton AMaria, Huang J, Alonso A
Secondary AuthorsGottesman RF
JournalJAMA Neurol
Volume75
Issue11
Pagination1375-1382
Date Published2018 11 01
ISSN2168-6157
KeywordsAfrican Americans, Age of Onset, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alcohol Drinking, Apolipoprotein E4, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Dementia, Diabetes Mellitus, Epilepsy, European Continental Ancestry Group, Exercise, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Smoking, Stroke, United States
Abstract

Importance: The incidence of epilepsy is higher in older age than at any other period of life. Stroke, dementia, and hypertension are associated with late-onset epilepsy; however, the role of other vascular and lifestyle factors remains unclear.

Objective: To identify midlife vascular and lifestyle risk factors for late-onset epilepsy.

Design, Setting, and Participants: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study is a prospective cohort study of 15 792 participants followed up since 1987 to 1989 with in-person visits, telephone calls, and surveillance of hospitalizations (10 974 invited without completing enrollment). The ARIC is a multicenter study with participants selected from 4 US communities. This study included 10 420 black or white participants from ARIC with at least 2 years of Medicare fee-for-service coverage and without missing baseline data. Data were analyzed betweeen April 2017 and May 2018.

Exposures: Demographic, vascular, lifestyle, and other possible epilepsy risk factors measured at baseline (age 45-64 years) were evaluated in multivariable survival models including demographics, vascular risk factors, and lifestyle risk factors.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Time to development of late-onset epilepsy (2 or more International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes for epilepsy or seizures starting at 60 years or older in any claim [hospitalization or outpatient Medicare through 2013]), with first code for seizures after at least 2 years without code for seizures.

Results: Of the 10 420 total participants (5878 women [56.4%] and 2794 black participants [26.8%]; median age 55 years at first visit), 596 participants developed late-onset epilepsy (3.33 per 1000 person-years). The incidence was higher in black than in white participants (4.71; 95% CI, 4.12-5.40 vs 2.88; 95% CI, 2.60-3.18 per 1000 person-years). In multivariable analysis, baseline hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30; 95% CI, 1.09-1.55), diabetes (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.17-1.80), smoking (HR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype (1 allele HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.02-1.45; 2 alleles HR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.35-2.81), and incident stroke (HR, 3.38; 95% CI, 2.78-4.10) and dementia (HR, 2.56; 95% CI, 2.11-3.12) were associated with an increased risk of late-onset epilepsy, while higher levels of physical activity (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-0.98) and moderate alcohol intake (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.90) were associated with a lower risk. Results were similar after censoring individuals with stroke or dementia.

Conclusions and Relevance: Potentially modifiable risk factors in midlife and the APOE ε4 genotype were positively associated with risk of developing late-onset epilepsy. Although stroke and dementia were both associated with late-onset epilepsy, vascular and lifestyle risk factors were significant even in the absence of stroke or dementia.

DOI10.1001/jamaneurol.2018.1935
Alternate JournalJAMA Neurol
PubMed ID30039175
PubMed Central IDPMC6248112
Grant ListHHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096917 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096902 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096814 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096899 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 AG052573 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States