Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Coffee consumption and liver-related hospitalizations and deaths in the ARIC study.

TitleCoffee consumption and liver-related hospitalizations and deaths in the ARIC study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsHu EA, Lazo M, Selvin E, Hamilton JP, Grams ME, Steffen LM, Coresh JJ
Secondary AuthorsRebholz CM
JournalEur J Clin Nutr
Volume73
Issue8
Pagination1133-1140
Date Published2019 08
ISSN1476-5640
KeywordsCoffee, Cohort Studies, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Liver Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Coffee consumption has been found to be associated with reduced risk of chronic conditions such as liver disease. However, less is known about the association between coffee and liver-related hospitalizations and deaths.

SUBJECTS/METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis on 14,208 participants aged 45-64 years from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Coffee consumption (cups/day) was assessed using food frequency questionnaires at visit 1 (1987-89) and visit 3 (1993-95). Liver-related hospitalizations were defined as a hospitalization with any International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) code related to liver disease identified through cohort surveillance. Liver-related death was defined as any death with a liver disease ICD-9 code listed anywhere on the death certificate form.

RESULTS: There were 833 incident cases of liver-related hospitalizations over a median follow-up of 24 years and 152 liver-related deaths over a median follow-up of 25 years. Participants who were in the highest category of coffee consumption (≥ 3 cups/day) were more likely to be men, whites, current smokers, and current alcohol drinkers. In our fully adjusted model, consuming ≥ 3 cups/day of coffee was significantly associated with a reduced risk of liver-related hospitalizations compared with never drinkers (hazard ratio: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.63-0.99). There were no significant associations between coffee consumption and liver-related deaths after adjusting for covariates.

CONCLUSIONS: Coffee drinkers may be at lower risk for liver-related hospitalizations. This supports current evidence that low and moderate levels of coffee may be protective to the liver.

DOI10.1038/s41430-018-0346-0
Alternate JournalEur J Clin Nutr
PubMed ID30341433
PubMed Central IDPMC6474824
Grant ListHHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01 DK107782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
K01 DK107782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States