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Physical activity trajectories and subsequent fall risk: ARIC Study.

TitlePhysical activity trajectories and subsequent fall risk: ARIC Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsGabriel KPettee, Griswold ME, Wang W, Conway SH, B Windham G, Palta P, Kucharska-Newton AMaria
Secondary AuthorsPompeii LA
JournalPrev Med
Volume121
Pagination40-46
Date Published2019 04
ISSN1096-0260
KeywordsAccidental Falls, Exercise, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Abstract

To examine the impact of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) trajectories during midlife and older adulthood with subsequent fall risk in later life. Cross-temporal analyses were conducted in 15,792 participants (27% black, 55% women) aged 45 to 64 years enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. MVPA was collected at Exams 1 (1987-89), 3 (1993-95) and 5 (2011-13) using the ARIC/Baecke questionnaire. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify the MVPA trajectory groups. Reported falls outcomes were collected in 2013-14, 2015-16, and 2016-17. Generalized Linear Models were used to estimate associations of baseline predictors with trajectory class membership, as well as associations of trajectory classes with any falling (adjusted incident relative risks, aIRR) and with number of falls (adjusted relative rates, aRR). Four primary trajectory classes emerged, reflecting longitudinal patterns of maintained high (48%), maintained low (22%), increasing (14%) and decreasing (15%) MVPA. After adjustment for covariates, the decreasing MVPA trajectory group had a 14% higher risk of reporting any falling compared to the maintained high MVPA group [aIRR = 1.14 (1.01, 1.28)]. When compared to the maintained high MVPA group, the maintained low and decreasing group had a 28% [aRR = 1.28 (1.14, 1.44)] and 27% [aRR = 1.27 (1.17, 1.38)] higher rate in the reported number of falls, respectively. Findings support public health campaigns targeting habitual MVPA or exercise for fall prevention and suggest that interventions should be initiated in midlife; a time when individuals may be more able and willing to change behavior.

DOI10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.02.007
Alternate JournalPrev Med
PubMed ID30742870
PubMed Central IDPMC6448408
Grant ListU01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096917 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096902 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096814 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R56 AG049886 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096899 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K99 AG052830 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States