Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Alcohol consumption and incident diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleAlcohol consumption and incident diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsHe X, Rebholz CM, Daya N, Lazo M
Secondary AuthorsSelvin E
JournalDiabetologia
Volume62
Issue5
Pagination770-778
Date Published2019 05
ISSN1432-0428
KeywordsAged, Alcohol Drinking, Alcoholism, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Reproducibility of Results, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prospective association between baseline and 9 year change in alcohol consumption and long-term risk of diabetes and whether these associations might be modified by sex and/or BMI.

METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of 12,042 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study participants without prevalent diabetes (55% women, 78% white, mean age 54 years). Alcohol consumption was assessed at visit 1 (1987-1989) and visit 4 (1996-1998). We used Cox models to estimate hazard ratios for diabetes risk by baseline drinking categories and change in alcohol consumption, stratified by sex and obesity status.

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 21 years, there were 3795 incident cases of diabetes. Among women, consuming 8-14 drinks/week was associated with a significantly lower risk of diabetes (HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.58, 0.96) compared with current drinkers consuming ≤1 drink/week. Among men, consuming 8-14 drinks/week was associated with a borderline significant lower risk of diabetes (HR 0.84, 95% CI 0.70, 1.00) and consuming >14 drinks/week was associated with a significantly lower risk of diabetes (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.67, 0.97) (p 

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In this community-based population, there was an inverse association between alcohol consumption and diabetes risk. The amount of the alcohol consumption associated with lower risk was different in women and men, and the association was more pronounced among participants with higher BMI.

DOI10.1007/s00125-019-4833-1
Alternate JournalDiabetologia
PubMed ID30820594
PubMed Central IDPMC6451679
Grant ListR01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
K01 DK107782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States