Alcohol Consumption and Incident Kidney Disease: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleAlcohol Consumption and Incident Kidney Disease: Results From the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsHu EA, Lazo M, Rosenberg SD, Grams ME, Steffen LM, Coresh JJ
Secondary AuthorsRebholz CM
JournalJ Ren Nutr
Volume30
Issue1
Pagination22-30
Date Published2020 01
ISSN1532-8503
Abstract

OBJECTIVE(S): Moderate alcohol consumption has been found to be associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease and myocardial infarction, which share similar risk factors and pathophysiology with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, there is inconsistent evidence on the association between alcohol consumption and CKD.

DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of 12,692 participants aged 45-64 years from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. We categorized participants into 6 alcohol consumption categories: never drinkers, former drinkers, ≤1 drink per week, 2 to 7 drinks per week, 8 to 14 drinks per week, and ≥15 drinks per week based on food frequency questionnaire responses at visit 1 (1987-1989). Incident CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 24 years, there were 3,664 cases of incident CKD. Current drinkers were more likely to be men, whites, and to have a higher income level and education level. After adjusting for total energy intake, age, sex, race-center, income, education level, health insurance, smoking, and physical activity, there was no significant association between being a former drinker and risk of incident CKD. Participants who drank ≤1 drink per week, 2 to 7 drinks per week, 8 to 14 drinks per week, and ≥15 drinks per week had, respectively, a 12% (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.79-0.97), 20% (HR: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.72-0.89), 29% (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.62-0.83), and 23% (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.65-0.91) lower risk of CKD compared with never drinkers.

CONCLUSION(S): Consuming a low or moderate amount of alcohol may lower the risk of developing CKD. Therefore, moderate consumption of alcohol may not likely be harmful to the kidneys.

DOI10.1053/j.jrn.2019.01.011
Alternate JournalJ Ren Nutr
PubMed ID30850190
PubMed Central IDPMC6728235
Grant ListK01 DK107782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R21 HL143089 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States