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No Association Found Between Midlife Seropositivity for Infection and Subsequent Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study (ARIC-NCS).

TitleNo Association Found Between Midlife Seropositivity for Infection and Subsequent Cognitive Decline: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study (ARIC-NCS).
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsGeorge KM, Folsom AR, Norby FL
Secondary AuthorsLutsey PL
JournalJ Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol
Volume33
Issue1
Pagination15-21
Date Published2020 01
ISSN0891-9887
KeywordsAtherosclerosis, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Infections, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors
Abstract

Infections of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), cytomegalovirus (CMV), , and may play a role in cognitive decline via systemic inflammation. We hypothesized that Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study participants who were seropositive in midlife for antibodies to HSV-1, CMV, , or would have an accelerated rate of cognitive decline over 20 years. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities performed a case-cohort study involving a stratified random sample of participants tested for serum immunoglobulin G antibodies to the pathogens of interest. We conducted a longitudinal study using this cohort. Cognitive change was measured using Z scores from the Delayed Word Recall (DWR), Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS), and Word Fluency (WF) Tests administered at visits 2 (1990-1992), 4 (1996-1998), and 5 (2011-2013). Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations and inverse probability of attrition weights were used to evaluate associations between infection and cognitive performance. Four hundred twenty-six participants were analyzed, of which 3% were seronegative for all 4 infections, 14% seropositive for one, 33% and 34% seropositive for 2 and 3, respectively, and 16% seropositive for all infections. At baseline, test scores were significantly lower for participants seropositive for and . After baseline covariate adjustment, the rate of decline in DWR, DSS, WF, and global scores did not differ significantly by infection status for any of the 4 infections. There was also no significant association between the number of infections for which participants were seropositive and cognitive decline. Our study provides no evidence supporting a longitudinal relationship between seropositivity and cognitive decline.

DOI10.1177/0891988719856692
Alternate JournalJ Geriatr Psychiatry Neurol
PubMed ID31203748
PubMed Central IDPMC6895401
Grant ListK24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL059367 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007779 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100006C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100007C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100008C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100009C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100010C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100011C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201100012C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL070825 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States