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Comparison of smoking-related DNA methylation between newborns from prenatal exposure and adults from personal smoking.

TitleComparison of smoking-related DNA methylation between newborns from prenatal exposure and adults from personal smoking.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsSikdar S, Joehanes R, Joubert BR, Xu C-J, Vives-Usano M, Rezwan FI, Felix JF, Ward JM, Guan W, Richmond RC, Brody JA, Küpers LK, Baïz N, Håberg SE, Smith JA, Reese SE, Aslibekyan S, Hoyo C, Dhingra R, Markunas CA, Xu T, Reynolds LM, Just AC, Mandaviya PR, Ghantous A, Bennett BD, Wang T, Consortium TBios, Bakulski KM, Melén E, Zhao S, Jin J, Herceg Z, van Meurs J, Taylor JA, Baccarelli AA, Murphy SK, Liu Y, Munthe-Kaas MCheng, Deary IJ, Nystad W, Waldenberger M, Annesi-Maesano I, Conneely K, Jaddoe VWv, Arnett D, Snieder H, Kardia SLr, Relton CL, Ong KK, Ewart S, Moreno-Macias H, Romieu I, Sotoodehnia N, Fornage M, Motsinger-Reif A, Koppelman GH, Bustamante M, Levy D
Secondary AuthorsLondon SJ
JournalEpigenomics
Volume11
Issue13
Pagination1487-1500
Date Published2019 10
ISSN1750-192X
KeywordsAdult, Cohort Studies, CpG Islands, DNA Methylation, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epigenomics, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Maternal Exposure, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Tobacco Smoking
Abstract

Cigarette smoking influences DNA methylation genome wide, in newborns from pregnancy exposure and in adults from personal smoking. Whether a unique methylation signature exists for exposure in newborns is unknown. We separately meta-analyzed newborn blood DNA methylation (assessed using Illumina450k Beadchip), in relation to sustained maternal smoking during pregnancy (9 cohorts, 5648 newborns, 897 exposed) and adult blood methylation and personal smoking (16 cohorts, 15907 participants, 2433 current smokers). Comparing meta-analyses, we identified numerous signatures specific to newborns along with many shared between newborns and adults. Unique smoking-associated genes in newborns were enriched in xenobiotic metabolism pathways. Our findings may provide insights into specific health impacts of prenatal exposure on offspring.

DOI10.2217/epi-2019-0066
Alternate JournalEpigenomics
PubMed ID31536415
PubMed Central IDPMC6836223
Grant ListR01 HL119443 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 MD013299 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
MC_UU_12015/2 / MRC_ / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
P42 ES010356 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK085173 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R24 ES028531 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
MC_UU_00011/5 / MRC_ / Medical Research Council / United Kingdom
R24 ES028533 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
Z01 ES049019 / ImNIH / Intramural NIH HHS / United States