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Association of insulin resistance, from mid-life to late-life, with aortic stiffness in late-life: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleAssociation of insulin resistance, from mid-life to late-life, with aortic stiffness in late-life: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsPoon AK, Meyer ML, Tanaka H, Selvin E, Pankow J, Zeng D, Loehr LR, Knowles JW, Rosamond WD
Secondary AuthorsHeiss G
JournalCardiovasc Diabetol
Volume19
Issue1
Pagination11
Date Published2020 Jan 28
ISSN1475-2840
KeywordsAge Factors, Aged, Aging, Biomarkers, Blood Glucose, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Lipids, Male, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, United States, Vascular Stiffness
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance may contribute to aortic stiffening that leads to end-organ damage. We examined the cross-sectional association and prospective association of insulin resistance and aortic stiffness in older adults without diabetes.

METHODS: We analyzed 2571 men and women at Visit 5 (in 2011-2013), and 2350 men and women at repeat examinations from baseline at Visit 1 (in 1987-1989) to Visit 5 (in 2011-2013). Linear regression was used to estimate the difference in aortic stiffness per standard unit of HOMA-IR, TG/HDL-C, and TyG at Visit 5. Linear mixed effects were used to assess if high, as opposed to non-high, aortic stiffness (> 75th percentile) was preceded by a faster annual rate of change in log-HOMA-IR, log-TG/HDL-C, and log-TyG from Visit 1 to Visit 5.

RESULTS: The mean age of participants was 75 years, 37% (n = 957) were men, and 17% (n = 433) were African American. At Visit 5, higher HOMA-IR, higher TG/HDL-C, and higher TyG were associated with higher aortic stiffness (16 cm/s per SD (95% CI 6, 27), 29 cm/s per SD (95% CI 18, 40), and 32 cm/s per SD (95% CI 22, 42), respectively). From Visit 1 to Visit 5, high aortic stiffness, compared to non-high aortic stiffness, was not preceded by a faster annual rate of change in log-HOMA-IR from baseline to 9 years (0.030 (95% CI 0.024, 0.035) vs. 0.025 (95% CI 0.021, 0.028); p = 0.15) or 9 years onward (0.011 (95% CI 0.007, 0.015) vs. 0.011 (95% CI 0.009, 0.013); p = 0.31); in log-TG/HDL-C from baseline to 9 years (0.019 (95% CI 0.015, 0.024) vs. 0.024 (95% CI 0.022, 0.026); p = 0.06) or 9 years onward (- 0.007 (95% CI - 0.010, - 0.005) vs. - 0.009 (95% CI - 0.010, - 0.007); p = 0.08); or in log-TyG from baseline to 9 years (0.002 (95% CI 0.002, 0.003) vs. 0.003 (95% CI 0.003, 0.003); p = 0.03) or 9 years onward (0 (95% CI 0, 0) vs. 0 (95% CI 0, 0); p = 0.08).

CONCLUSIONS: Among older adults without diabetes, insulin resistance was associated with aortic stiffness, but the putative role of insulin resistance in aortic stiffness over the life course requires further study.

DOI10.1186/s12933-020-0986-y
Alternate JournalCardiovasc Diabetol
PubMed ID31992297
PubMed Central IDPMC6986071
Grant ListP30DK116074 / / Stanford Diabetes Research Center /
2 T32 HL 7055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01AG053938 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK116750 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
1R01DK106236 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
1R01HL135313 / NH / NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK116074 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States