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Associations of serum uric acid with incident dementia and cognitive decline in the ARIC-NCS cohort.

TitleAssociations of serum uric acid with incident dementia and cognitive decline in the ARIC-NCS cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsAlam AB, Wu A, Power MC, West NA
Secondary AuthorsAlonso A
JournalJ Neurol Sci
Volume414
Pagination116866
Date Published2020 Jul 15
ISSN1878-5883
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Elevated serum uric acid (SUA) is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, which often contribute to dementia and dementia-like morbidity, yet several cross-sectional studies have shown protective associations with cognition, which would be consistent with other work showing benefits of elevated SUA through its antioxidant properties.

METHODS: We studied 11,169 participants free of dementia and cardiovascular disease from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort. SUA was measured in blood samples collected in 1990-92, baseline for this study (age range 47-70 years). Incident dementia was ascertained based on clinical assessments in 2011-13 and 2016-17, surveillance based on dementia screeners conducted over telephone interviews, hospitalization discharge codes, and death certificates. Cognitive function was assessed up to four times between 1990 and 92 and 2016-17. We estimated the association of SUA, categorized into quartiles, with incidence of dementia using Cox regression models adjusting for potential confounders. The association between cognitive decline and SUA was assessed using generalized estimating equations.

RESULTS: Over a median follow-up period of 24.1 years, 2005 cases of dementia were identified. High baseline SUA was associated with incident dementia (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.12, 1.47) when adjusted for sociodemographic variables. However, after further adjustment including cardiovascular risk factors, this relationship disappeared (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.88, 1.21). Elevated baseline SUA was associated with faster cognitive decline even after further adjustment (25-year global z-score difference, -0.149; 95% CI, -0.246, -0.052).

CONCLUSION: Higher levels of mid-life SUA were associated with faster cognitive decline, but not necessarily with higher risk of dementia.

DOI10.1016/j.jns.2020.116866
Alternate JournalJ Neurol Sci
PubMed ID32387846
PubMed Central IDPMC7293945
Grant ListU01 HL096812 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096917 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096902 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096814 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL070825 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 HL148521 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U01 HL096899 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States