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Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Hospitalizations and Mortality in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

TitleAlcohol Consumption and Risk of Hospitalizations and Mortality in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsDaya NR, Rebholz CM, Appel LJ, Selvin E
Secondary AuthorsLazo M
JournalAlcohol Clin Exp Res
Volume44
Issue8
Pagination1646-1657
Date Published2020 08
ISSN1530-0277
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Public health recommendations on the benefits and harms of moderate alcohol intake require a thorough and unbiased understanding of all potential effects of various levels and patterns of alcohol consumption. We seek to evaluate the associations between patterns of current and past alcohol consumption with hospitalizations and mortality.

METHODS: Data came from a prospective cohort of 12,327 adults (56% women, 78% white, mean age 60 years) participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study visit 3 (1993 to 1995). Current and past alcohol consumption was based on self-report. Hospitalizations and mortality were ascertained through December 31, 2017. Negative binomial and Cox proportional hazards regressions were used.

RESULTS: 24.8% of the study population reported never drinking, 48.3% reported currently drinking without a history of heavy drinking, 4.2% reported currently drinking with a history of heavy drinking, 19.2% reported being former drinkers without a history of heavy drinking, and 3.4% reported being former drinkers with a history of heavy drinking. Compared to those who reported drinking ≤1 to 7 drinks/wk, never drinkers (incident rate ratio [IRR]: 1.21 (95% confidence interval 1.13, 1.29) and former drinkers with (IRR: 1.43 [1.26, 1.63]) or without (IRR: 1.21 [1.13, 1.30]) a history of heavy drinking had a positive association with all-cause hospitalization (p 

CONCLUSIONS: The positive associations with hospitalization and mortality were stronger among never and former drinkers compared to those who consume ≤1 to 7 drinks/wk. Former drinkers with a history of heavy drinking had a stronger positive association with adverse health outcomes than former drinkers without a history of heavy drinking, highlighting the impact of this pattern of alcohol consumption.

DOI10.1111/acer.14393
Alternate JournalAlcohol Clin Exp Res
PubMed ID32524620
PubMed Central IDPMC7484412
Grant ListR01 DK108784 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
K01 DK107782 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R21 HL143089 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K24 DK106414 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States