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Mid- and Late-Life Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Global Brain Amyloid Burden: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC)-PET Study.

TitleMid- and Late-Life Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Global Brain Amyloid Burden: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC)-PET Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsPalta P, Heiss G, Sharrett ARichey, Gabriel KPettee, Walker K, Evenson KR, Knopman D, Mosley TH, Wong DF
Secondary AuthorsGottesman RF
JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
Volume76
Issue1
Pagination139-147
Date Published2020
ISSN1875-8908
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physical activity (PA) may slow the development of dementia by reducing the accumulation of amyloid.

OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that higher levels of leisure-time PA in mid- or late-life were associated with lower brain amyloid burden in late-life among 326 non-demented participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study of brain florbetapir positron emission tomography (ARIC-PET) ancillary.

METHODS: Self-reported PA was quantified using a past-year recall, interviewer-administered questionnaire in mid-life (1987-1989, aged 45-64 years) and late-life (2011-2013, aged 67-89 years). Continuous PA estimates were classified as 1) any leisure-time PA participation (yes/no); 2) meeting the 2018 United States' PA guidelines (yes/no); and 3) per 1 standard deviation (SD) higher metabolic equivalent of task (MET) minutes per week (MET·min·wk-1). A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan with Florbetapir PET was performed in late-life. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) of elevated amyloid burden, defined as a global cortical standardized uptake value ratio (>1.2), compared to no elevated amyloid burden were estimated according to PA measures.

RESULTS: Among the 326 participants (mean age: 76 years, 42% male, 41% Black), 52% had elevated brain amyloid burden. Mid-life leisure-time PA did not show a statistically significant lower odds of elevated late-life amyloid burden (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.43-1.18). A 1 SD (970 MET. min. wk-1) higher PA level in mid-life was also not significantly associated withelevated amyloid burden (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.69-1.15). Similar estimates were observed for meeting versus not meeting PA guidelines in both mid- and late-life.

CONCLUSION: Self-reported higher mid- and late-life leisure-time PA were not significantly associated with lower amyloid burden. Data show a trend of an association, which is, however, imprecise, suggesting replication in larger studies.

DOI10.3233/JAD-200152
Alternate JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
PubMed ID32444546