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Diabetes and the risk of hospitalisation for infection: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

TitleDiabetes and the risk of hospitalisation for infection: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsFang M, Ishigami J, Echouffo-Tcheugui JB, Lutsey PL, Pankow JS, Selvin E
JournalDiabetologia
Date Published2021 Aug 04
ISSN1432-0428
Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this work was to assess the association between diabetes and risk for infection-related hospitalisation and mortality.

METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort analysis of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Diabetes was defined as a fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/l or non-fasting glucose ≥11.1 mmol/l, self-report of a diagnosis of diabetes by a physician, or current diabetes medication use. Hospitalisation for infection was ascertained from hospital discharge records. Participants were followed from 1987-1989 to 2019.

RESULTS: We included 12,379 participants (mean age 54.5 years; 24.7% Black race; 54.3% female sex). During a median follow-up of 23.8 years, there were 4229 new hospitalisations for infection. After adjusting for potential confounders, people with (vs without) diabetes at baseline had a higher risk for hospitalisation for infection (HR 1.67 [95% CI 1.52, 1.83]). Results were generally consistent across infection type but the association was especially pronounced for foot infection (HR 5.99 [95% CI 4.38, 8.19]). Diabetes was more strongly associated with hospitalisation for infection in younger participants and Black people. Overall infection mortality was low (362 deaths due to infection) but the adjusted risk was increased for people with diabetes (HR 1.72 [95% CI 1.28, 2.31]).

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Diabetes confers significant risk for infection-related hospitalisation. Enhancing prevention and early treatment of infection in those with diabetes is needed to reduce infection-related morbidity and mortality.

DOI10.1007/s00125-021-05522-3
Alternate JournalDiabetologia
PubMed ID34345973
PubMed Central IDPMC8331324
Grant ListR01 DK089174 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007024 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States