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Lipid-Lowering Drug Use and Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the ARIC Study.

TitleLipid-Lowering Drug Use and Cancer Incidence and Mortality in the ARIC Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsMarrone MT, Mondul AM, Prizment AE, Couper D, Barber JR, Chappidi MR, Joshu CE, Platz EA
JournalJNCI Cancer Spectr
Volume5
Issue5
Date Published2021 10
ISSN2515-5091
KeywordsAge Factors, Atherosclerosis, Breast Neoplasms, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Hypolipidemic Agents, Incidence, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Obesity, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Prostatic Neoplasms, Smoking, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Abstract

Background: Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, are associated with reduced incidence of certain cancers in some studies. Associations with cancer mortality are not well studied, and whether associations are similar across race is unknown.

Methods: We conducted a prospective analysis of 12 997 cancer-free participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study who were never users at visit 1 (1987-1989). Ever use, duration of use, and age at first use were modeled as time-dependent variables using Cox regression to estimate associations with total, obesity- and smoking-associated, bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

Results: We ascertained 3869 cancer cases and 1661 cancer deaths in 237 999 or more person-years. At 6 years of follow-up, 70.8% of lipid-lowering drug use was a statin. Compared with never use, ever use was associated with lower total, obesity- and smoking-associated cancer mortality and with colorectal cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.32 to 0.79) and incidence (HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53 to 0.92). Inverse associations were consistent by sex and race. Shorter-term use was associated with bladder cancer incidence in men (

Conclusions: This study provides additional evidence for inverse associations between lipid-lowering drug use and cancer incidence and mortality but a positive association with bladder cancer incidence in men. Evaluation of the impact of chemoprevention strategies that include lipid-lowering drugs on population-level cancer burden is needed.

DOI10.1093/jncics/pkab080
Alternate JournalJNCI Cancer Spectr
PubMed ID34738072
PubMed Central IDPMC8562700
Grant ListT32 CA009314 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
U01 CA164975 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA006973 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
K99 CA246097 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States