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Periodontal disease measures and risk of incident peripheral artery disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.

TitlePeriodontal disease measures and risk of incident peripheral artery disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsArsiwala LT, Mok Y, Yang C, Ishigami J, Selvin E, Beck JD, Allison MA, Heiss G, Demmer RT, Matsushita K
JournalJ Periodontol
Date Published2021 Sep 29
ISSN1943-3670
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The association of periodontal disease with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases is well known, but not specifically with incident peripheral artery disease (PAD). Therefore, we studied the associations of periodontal disease with incident PAD in a population-based setting.

METHODS: Among 9,793 participants (aged 53-75 years) without prevalent PAD, self-reported history of periodontal disease was ascertained. Of these, 5,872 participants underwent full-mouth examinations from which periodontal status was defined using the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-American Academy of Periodontology (CDC-AAP) definition. We quantified the association of periodontal disease with incident PAD (defined by hospital admission diagnosis or procedures) using multivariable Cox regression models.

RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 20.1 years, 360 participants (3.6%) developed PAD. In models accounting for potential confounders including diabetes and smoking pack-years, there was higher hazard of PAD in participants with self-reported tooth loss because of periodontal disease (hazard ratio:1.54 [95% CI:1.20-1.98]), history of periodontal disease treatment (1.37 [1.05-1.80]), and periodontal disease diagnosis (1.38 [1.09-1.74]), compared to their respective counterparts. The clinical measure of periodontal disease (n = 5,872) was not significantly associated with incident PAD in the fully adjusted model (e.g., 1.53 [0.94-2.50] in CDC-AAP-defined severe periodontal disease versus no disease).

CONCLUSION: We observed a modest association of self-reported periodontal disease, especially when resulting in tooth loss, with incident PAD in the general population. Nonetheless, a larger study with the clinical measure of periodontal disease is warranted.

DOI10.1002/JPER.21-0342
Alternate JournalJ Periodontol
PubMed ID34590322
Grant ListK24 HL152440 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States