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Association of Carotenoid Intake with Pulmonary Function.

TitleAssociation of Carotenoid Intake with Pulmonary Function.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsJun L, Root M
JournalJ Am Coll Nutr
Volume40
Issue8
Pagination708-712
Date Published2021 Nov-Dec
ISSN1541-1087
Keywordsbeta Carotene, Carotenoids, Diet, Forced Expiratory Volume, Humans, Lung, Vital Capacity
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory disease causing more than three million deaths annually around the world. Previous studies have shown an increased incidence of COPD among smokers. Studies also have shown antioxidant nutrients such as carotenoids, have been associated with lower rates of COPD.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate if the consumption of carotenoids and carotenoid-rich foods is associated with higher pulmonary function.

METHODS: Data were taken from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, which included approximately 15,000 individuals aged 45-64 years at baseline. Dietary intake of carotenoids and carotenoid-rich foods were assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Total carotenoid intake was calculated by summing five specific carotenoids: α-carotene, β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, and lutein/zeaxanthin. Pulmonary function was evaluated as the ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV] and forced vital capacity [FVC]. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between the intakes of carotenoids and carotenoid-rich foods and pulmonary function. Significance level was  < 0.05.

RESULTS: A positive association between the total carotenoid intake with pulmonary function was only marginally significant; however, α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin were each positively associated ( = 0.001,  = 0.003,  = 0.007, respectively) with FEV/FVC ratio in study participants. Food sources of these pro-vitamin A carotenes were also positively associated ( = 0.008) with FEV/FVC ratio.

CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests a possible role for the provitamin A carotenes, and their associated foods in improved pulmonary health.

DOI10.1080/07315724.2020.1815608
Alternate JournalJ Am Coll Nutr
PubMed ID33030982