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Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Polyvascular Disease in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: The ARIC Study.

TitlePrevalence and Prognostic Significance of Polyvascular Disease in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: The ARIC Study.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsChunawala ZS, Qamar A, Arora S, Pandey A, Fudim M, Vaduganathan M, Bhatt DL, Mentz RJ, Caughey MC
JournalJ Card Fail
Volume28
Issue8
Pagination1267-1277
Date Published2022 08
ISSN1532-8414
KeywordsAged, Atherosclerosis, Female, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Prevalence, Prognosis, Quality of Life, Retrospective Studies, Stroke Volume
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Polyvascular disease is associated with increased mortality rates and decreased quality of life. Whether its prevalence or associated outcomes differ for patients hospitalized with heart failure with reduced vs preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF vs HFpEF, respectively) is uncertain.

METHODS: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study conducted hospital surveillance of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) from 2005-2014. Polyvascular disease (coexisting disease in ≥ 2 arterial beds) was identified based on the finding of prevalent coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease or cerebrovascular disease. Mortality risks associated with polyvascular disease were analyzed separately for HFpEF and HFrEF, with adjustment for potential confounders. All analyses were weighted by the inverse of the sampling probability.

RESULTS: Of 24,937 weighted (5460 unweighted) hospitalizations due to ADHF (52% female, 32% Black, mean age 75 years), polyvascular disease was prevalent in 22% with HFrEF and in 17% with HFpEF. One-year mortality risks increased sequentially with 0, 1 and ≥ 2 arterial bed involvement, both for patients with HFrEF (29%-32%-38%; P trend = 0.0006) and for those with HFpEF (26%-32%-37%; P trend < 0.0001). After adjustments, polyvascular disease was associated with a 26% higher mortality hazard for patients with HFrEF (HR = 1.26; 95% CI: 1.07-1.50) and a 29% higher hazard for patients with HFpEF (HR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.62), with no interaction by HF type (P interaction = 0.9).

CONCLUSION: Patients hospitalized with ADHF and coexisting polyvascular disease have an increased risk of death, irrespective of HF type. Clinical attention should be directed toward polyvascular disease, with implementation of secondary prevention strategies to improve the prognosis of this high-risk population.

SUMMARY: Polyvascular disease is known to be associated with myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death and is a major risk factor for decreased quality of life. This study sought to evaluate the relationship between polyvascular disease and mortality in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and to understand whether the associations differ based on ejection fraction. Patients hospitalized with ADHF and coexisting polyvascular disease had an increased risk of death, irrespective of heart failure type, implying the need for increased clinical attention directed toward polyvascular disease, along with implementation of secondary prevention strategies to improve prognosis.

TWEET: Patients hospitalized with acute HF and coexisting polyvascular disease face an increased risk of death, irrespective of HF type.

DOI10.1016/j.cardfail.2022.01.002
Alternate JournalJ Card Fail
PubMed ID35045321
PubMed Central IDPMC9287495
Grant ListHHSN268201700002C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700001C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL151744 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700003C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700002I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201700005I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States