Pulse lineResearch With Heart Logo

Blood Pressure and Later-Life Cognition in Hispanic and White Adults (BP-COG): A Pooled Cohort Analysis of ARIC, CARDIA, CHS, FOS, MESA, and NOMAS.

TitleBlood Pressure and Later-Life Cognition in Hispanic and White Adults (BP-COG): A Pooled Cohort Analysis of ARIC, CARDIA, CHS, FOS, MESA, and NOMAS.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsLevine DA, Gross AL, Brice├▒o EM, Tilton N, Whitney R, Han D, Giordani BJ, Sussman JB, Hayward RA, Burke JF, Elkind MSV, Moran AE, Tom S, Gottesman RF, Gaskin DJ, Sidney S, Yaffe K, Sacco RL, Heckbert SR, Hughes TM, Lopez OL, Allen NBai, Galecki AT
JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
Date Published2022 Aug 12
ISSN1875-8908
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Ethnic differences in cognitive decline have been reported. Whether they can be explained by differences in systolic blood pressure (SBP) is uncertain.

OBJECTIVE: Determine whether cumulative mean SBP levels explain differences in cognitive decline between Hispanic and White individuals.

METHODS: Pooled cohort study of individual participant data from six cohorts (1971-2017). The present study reports results on SBP and cognition among Hispanic and White individuals. Outcomes were changes in global cognition (GC) (primary), executive function (EF) (secondary), and memory standardized as t-scores (mean [SD], 50 [10]); a 1-point difference represents a 0.1 SD difference in cognition. Median follow-up was 7.7 (Q1-Q3, 5.2-20.1) years.

RESULTS: We included 24,570 participants free of stroke and dementia: 2,475 Hispanic individuals (median age, cumulative mean SBP at first cognitive assessment, 67 years, 132.5 mmHg; 40.8% men) and 22,095 White individuals (60 years,134 mmHg; 47.3% men). Hispanic individuals had slower declines in GC, EF, and memory than White individuals when all six cohorts were examined. Two cohorts recruited Hispanic individuals by design. In a sensitivity analysis, Hispanic individuals in these cohorts had faster decline in GC, similar decline in EF, and slower decline in memory than White individuals. Higher time-varying cumulative mean SBP was associated with faster declines in GC, EF, and memory in all analyses. After adjusting for time-varying cumulative mean SBP, differences in cognitive slopes between Hispanic and White individuals did not change.

CONCLUSION: We found no evidence that cumulative mean SBP differences explained differences in cognitive decline between Hispanic and White individuals.

DOI10.3233/JAD-220366
Alternate JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
PubMed ID35964190