The Association between Incarceration and Transactional Sex among HIV-infected Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.

TitleThe Association between Incarceration and Transactional Sex among HIV-infected Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in the United States.
Publication TypePublication
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsPhilbin MM, Kinnard EN, Tanner AE, Ware S, Chambers BD, Ma A, J Fortenberry D
JournalJ Urban Health
Volume95
Issue4
Pagination576-583
Date Published2018 Aug
ISSN1468-2869
Abstract

<p>Criminal justice practices in the USA disproportionately affect sexual and racial/ethnic minority men, who are at higher risk of incarceration. Previous research demonstrates associations between incarceration and sexual risk behaviors for men who have sex with men (MSM). However, little of this work focuses on young MSM (YMSM), particularly HIV-infected YMSM, despite nearly one-third reporting engagement in sexual risk behaviors, such as transactional sex. We therefore explored the association between incarceration and transactional sex among HIV-infected YMSM. We recruited 97 HIV-infected YMSM across 14 clinical sites in urban centers from August 2015 to February 2016. We used multivariate logistic regression to examine the relationship between incarceration and transactional sex among YMSM. The majority was 24 years old (78%) and racial/ethnic minority (95%); over half were not in school and reported an annual income of < $12,000. In the multivariate model, having ever been incarcerated (aOR = 3.20; 95% CI 1.07-9.63) was independently associated with a history of transactional sex. Being 24 years vs. younger (aOR = 9.68; 95% CI 1.42-65.78) and having ever been homeless (aOR = 3.71, 95% CI 1.18-11.65) also remained independently associated with a history of transactional sex. This analysis fills a gap in the literature by examining the relationship between incarceration and transactional sex among HIV-infected YMSM. Facilitating youths' engagement with social services available in their HIV clinic may serve as a key strategy in promoting health. Public health efforts need to address social-structural factors driving disproportionate rates of arrest and incarceration and related harms among this population.</p>

DOI10.1007/s11524-018-0247-5
Alternate JournalJ Urban Health
PubMed ID29633227
PubMed Central IDPMC6095762
Grant ListU01 HD040533 / NICHD NIH HHS / National Institute of Child Health & Human Development / United States
U01 HD 040533 / / Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development /
U01 HD040474 / NICHD NIH HHS / National Institute of Child Health & Human Development / United States
U01 HD 040474 / / Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development /
L60 MD009069 / NIMHD NIH HHS / National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities / United States
K01DA039804A / NIDA NIH HHS / National Institute on Drug Abuse / United States
R01 MH098723 / NIMH NIH HHS / National Institute of Mental Health / United States
K01 DA039804 / NIDA NIH HHS / National Institute on Drug Abuse / United States
P2C HD058486 / NICHD NIH HHS / National Institute of Child Health & Human Development / United States