Syndemic theory and HIV-related risk among young transgender women: the role of multiple, co-occurring health problems and social marginalization.

TitleSyndemic theory and HIV-related risk among young transgender women: the role of multiple, co-occurring health problems and social marginalization.
Publication TypePublication
Year of Publication2012
AuthorsBrennan J, Kuhns LM, Johnson AK, Belzer M, Wilson EC, Garofalo R
Corporate AuthorsAdolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions
JournalAm J Public Health
Volume102
Issue9
Pagination1751-7
Date Published2012 Sep
ISSN1541-0048
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Chicago, Crime Victims, Data Collection, Domestic Violence, Female, HIV, HIV Infections, Humans, Los Angeles, Psychology, Risk Factors, Risk-Taking, Self Concept, Sexual Behavior, Substance-Related Disorders, Transsexualism, Young Adult
Abstract

<p><b>OBJECTIVES: </b>We assessed whether multiple psychosocial factors are additive in their relationship to sexual risk behavior and self-reported HIV status (i.e., can be characterized as a syndemic) among young transgender women and the relationship of indicators of social marginalization to psychosocial factors.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>Participants (n = 151) were aged 15 to 24 years and lived in Chicago or Los Angeles. We collected data on psychosocial factors (low self-esteem, polysubstance use, victimization related to transgender identity, and intimate partner violence) and social marginalization indicators (history of commercial sex work, homelessness, and incarceration) through an interviewer-administered survey.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Syndemic factors were positively and additively related to sexual risk behavior and self-reported HIV infection. In addition, our syndemic index was significantly related to 2 indicators of social marginalization: a history of sex work and previous incarceration.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>These findings provide evidence for a syndemic of co-occurring psychosocial and health problems in young transgender women, taking place in a context of social marginalization.</p>

DOI10.2105/AJPH.2011.300433
Alternate JournalAm J Public Health
PubMed ID22873480
PubMed Central IDPMC3416048
Grant ListU01 HD052172-05 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD040533 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD040474 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD052172-03 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD052172-01 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD052172-04 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD052172-02 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD052172 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States