Predictors of Self-Reported Adherence to Antiretroviral Medication in a Multisite Study of Ethnic and Racial Minority HIV-Positive Youth.

TitlePredictors of Self-Reported Adherence to Antiretroviral Medication in a Multisite Study of Ethnic and Racial Minority HIV-Positive Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsMacDonell KKolmodin, Jacques-Tiura AJ, Naar S, Fernandez MIsabella
Corporate AuthorsATN 086/106 Protocol Team
JournalJ Pediatr Psychol
Volume41
Issue4
Pagination419-28
Date Published2016 May
ISSN1465-735X
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, Chronic Disease, Continental Population Groups, Ethnic Groups, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Medication Adherence, Minority Groups, Self Efficacy, Self Report, Social Support, Substance-Related Disorders, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

<p><b>OBJECTIVE: </b>To test social cognitive predictors of medication adherence in racial/ethnic minority youth living with HIV using a conceptual model.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>Youth were participants in two descriptive studies by the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions. Minority youth ages 16-24 years who were prescribed antiretroviral medication were included (N = 956). Data were collected through chart extraction and/or laboratory testing and by Audio Computer-Assisted Self-Interview.</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>39% of youth reported suboptimal adherence. Path analysis was used to explore predictors of medication adherence. Higher self-efficacy predicted higher readiness and adherence. Greater social support predicted higher self-efficacy. Psychological symptoms and substance use were associated with several predictors and lower adherence.</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>The model provided a plausible framework for understanding adherence in this population. Culturally competent, but individually tailored, interventions focused on increasing self-efficacy to take medication and reducing risk behaviors (e.g., substance use) may be helpful for racial or ethnic minority youth with HIV.</p>

DOI10.1093/jpepsy/jsv097
Alternate JournalJ Pediatr Psychol
PubMed ID26498724
PubMed Central IDPMC6080484
Grant ListU01 HD040533 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD 040474 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
U01 HD 040533 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States