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Cross-sectional and prospective associations between sleep regularity and metabolic health in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleCross-sectional and prospective associations between sleep regularity and metabolic health in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsFritz J, Phillips AJK, Hunt LC, Imam A, Reid KJ, Perreira KM, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Daviglus ML, Sotres-Alvarez D, Zee PC, Patel SR, Vetter C
JournalSleep
Volume44
Issue4
Date Published2021 04 09
ISSN1550-9109
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Hispanic Americans, Humans, insulin resistance, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, sleep, Young Adult
Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Sleep is an emergent, multi-dimensional risk factor for diabetes. Sleep duration, timing, quality, and insomnia have been associated with diabetes risk and glycemic biomarkers, but the role of sleep regularity in the development of metabolic disorders is less clear.METHODS: We analyzed data from 2107 adults, aged 19-64 years, from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, followed over a mean of 5.7 years. Multivariable-adjusted complex survey regression methods were used to model cross-sectional and prospective associations between the sleep regularity index (SRI) in quartiles (Q1-least regular, Q4-most regular) and diabetes (either laboratory-confirmed or self-reported antidiabetic medication use), baseline levels of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), beta-cell function (HOMA-β), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and their changes over time.RESULTS: Cross-sectionally, lower SRI was associated with higher odds of diabetes (odds ratio [OR]Q1 vs. Q4 = 1.64, 95% CI: 0.98-2.74, ORQ2 vs. Q4 = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.70-1.81, ORQ3 vs. Q4 = 1.00, 95% CI: 0.62-1.62, ptrend = 0.023). The SRI effect was more pronounced in older (aged ≥ 45 years) adults (ORQ1 vs. Q4 = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.14-3.12, pinteraction = 0.060) compared to younger ones. No statistically significant associations were found between SRI and diabetes incidence, as well as baseline HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, and HbA1c values, or their changes over time among adults not taking antidiabetic medication.CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that sleep regularity represents another sleep dimension relevant for diabetes risk. Further research is needed to elucidate the relative contribution of sleep regularity to metabolic dysregulation and pathophysiology.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsaa218
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID33095850
PubMed Central IDPMC8033445
Grant ListP30 AG066615 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0835
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Ancillary Study Investigators - Not at HCHS/SOL site
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published