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Predictors of incident diabetes in two populations: framingham heart study and hispanic community health study / study of latinos.

TitlePredictors of incident diabetes in two populations: framingham heart study and hispanic community health study / study of latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2022
AuthorsKaplan RC, Song RJ, Lin J, Xanthakis V, Hua S, Chernofsky A, Evenson KR, Walker ME, Cuthbertson C, Murabito JM, Cordero C, Daviglus M, Perreira KM, Gellman M, Sotres-Alvarez D, Vasan RS, Xue X, Spartano NL, Mossavar-Rahmani Y
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume22
Issue1
Pagination1053
Date Published2022 05 26
ISSN1471-2458
KeywordsAdult, Body mass index, Diabetes Mellitus, Hispanic or Latino, Humans, Hypertension, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Public Health
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Non-genetic factors contribute to differences in diabetes risk across race/ethnic and socioeconomic groups, which raises the question of whether effects of predictors of diabetes are similar across populations. We studied diabetes incidence in the primarily non-Hispanic White Framingham Heart Study (FHS, N = 4066) and the urban, largely immigrant Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL, N = 6891) Please check if the affiliations are captured and presented correctly.METHODS: Clinical, behavioral, and socioeconomic characteristics were collected at in-person examinations followed by seven-day accelerometry. Among individuals without diabetes, Cox proportional hazards regression models (both age- and sex-adjusted, and then multivariable-adjusted for all candidate predictors) identified predictors of incident diabetes over a decade of follow-up, defined using clinical history or laboratory assessments.RESULTS: Four independent predictors were shared between FHS and HCHS/SOL. In each cohort, the multivariable-adjusted hazard of diabetes increased by approximately 50% for every ten-year increment of age and every five-unit increment of body mass index (BMI), and was 50-70% higher among hypertensive than among non-hypertensive individuals (all P < 0.01). Compared with full-time employment status, the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for part-time employment was 0.61 (0.37,1.00) in FHS and 0.62 (0.41,0.95) in HCHS/SOL. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was an additional predictor in common observed in age- and sex-adjusted models, which did not persist after adjustment for other covariates (compared with MVPA ≤ 5 min/day, HR for MVPA level ≥ 30 min/day was 0.48 [0.31,0.74] in FHS and 0.74 [0.56,0.97] in HCHS/SOL). Additional predictors found in sex- and age-adjusted analyses among the FHS participants included male gender and lower education, but these predictors were not found to be independent of others in multivariable adjusted models, nor were they associated with diabetes risk among HCHS/SOL adults.CONCLUSIONS: The same four independent predictors - age, body mass index, hypertension and employment status - were associated with diabetes risk across two disparate US populations. While the reason for elevated diabetes risk in full-time workers is unclear, the findings suggest that diabetes may be part of the work-related burden of disease. Our findings also support prior evidence that differences by gender and socioeconomic position in diabetes risk are not universally present across populations.

DOI10.1186/s12889-022-13463-8
Alternate JournalBMC Public Health
PubMed ID35619100
PubMed Central IDPMC9137165
Grant ListHHSN268201000031C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG055527 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN261201300005I / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG047645 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201000001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN261201300004I / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201000021C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201500001I / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC25195 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL136266 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL131029 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
1016
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published