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Association of neighborhood segregation with 6-year incidence of metabolic syndrome in the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.

TitleAssociation of neighborhood segregation with 6-year incidence of metabolic syndrome in the Hispanic community health study/study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2023
AuthorsPichardo CM, Pichardo MS, Gallo LC, Talavera GA, Chambers EC, Sanchez-Johnsen LAP, Pirzada A, Roy AL, Rodriguez C, Castañeda SF, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Perreira KM, Garcia TP, Allison M, Carlson J, Daviglus ML, Plascak JJ
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume78
Pagination1-8
Date Published2023 Feb
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsHispanic or Latino, Humans, Incidence, Metabolic syndrome, Prospective Studies, Public Health, Residence Characteristics
Abstract

PURPOSE: Examine the association between neighborhood segregation and 6-year incident metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.METHODS: Prospective cohort of adults residing in Miami, Chicago, the Bronx, and San Diego. The analytic sample included 6,710 participants who did not have MetSyn at baseline. The evenness and exposure dimensions of neighborhood segregation, based on the Gini and Isolation indices, respectively, were categorized into quintiles (Q). Racialized economic concentration was measured with the Index of Concentration at the Extremes (continuously and Q).RESULTS: Exposure, but not evenness, was associated with higher disease odds (Q1 (lower segregation) vs. Q4, OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.082.17; Q5, OR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.493.52). Economic concentrationprivilege (continuous OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.770.98), racial concentrationracialized privilege (Q1 (greater concentration) vs. Q2 OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.541.04; Q3 OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.441.05; Q4 OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.451.01; Q5 OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.420.98)(continuous OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.821.04), and racialized economic concentrationprivilege (i.e., higher SES non-Hispanic White, continuous OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.760.98) were associated with lower disease odds.CONCLUSION: Hispanics/Latino adults residing in neighborhoods with high segregation had higher risk of incident MetSyn compared to those residing in neighborhoods with low segregation. Research is needed to identify the mechanisms that link segregation to poor metabolic health.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2022.11.003
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID36473628
PubMed Central IDPMC10127516
Grant ListHHSN268201300005C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
U54 CA202995 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK092949 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P30 ES010126 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300004C / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300001C / HB / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HHSN268201300003C / HG / NHGRI NIH HHS / United States
T32 CA057699 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
1093
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published