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Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos.

TitleDo all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsLlabre MM, Arguelles W, Schneiderman N, Gallo LC, Daviglus ML, Chambers EC, Sotres-Alvarez D, Chirinos DA, Talavera GA, Castañeda SF, Roesch SC, Heiss G
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume25
Issue7
Pagination480-5
Date Published2015 Jul
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Blood Glucose, blood pressure, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cluster Analysis, Coronary Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Lipids, Male, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States, Waist Circumference, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: Metabolic syndrome (MetS), the clustering of several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent in Hispanics/Latinos. We tested whether all components significantly loaded on the syndrome in Hispanics/Latinos and whether their contribution differed by sex and Hispanic ancestry. We also examined associations of MetS with prevalent diabetes and coronary heart disease in Hispanics/Latinos.METHODS: Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of n = 15,823 participants in the HCHS/SOL study who self-identified as being of Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, or South American ancestry and were aged 18 to 74 years at screening.RESULTS: A latent variable model of waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and fasting glucose fit the data in men and women, but the contribution of HDL-C was weak. No difference in the latent model of MetS was detected across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups. MetS was significantly associated with diabetes and coronary heart disease.CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that similar criteria for MetS may be applied across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups but call into question the role of HDL-C in classifying the MetS in Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.02.010
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID25818844
PubMed Central IDPMC4457574
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL125466 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0036
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published