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Social and Health Correlates of Sleep Duration in a US Hispanic Population: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSocial and Health Correlates of Sleep Duration in a US Hispanic Population: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2015
AuthorsPatel SR, Sotres-Alvarez D, Castañeda SF, Dudley KA, Gallo LC, Hernandez R, Medeiros EA, Penedo FJ, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Ramos AR, Redline S, Reid KJ, Zee PC
JournalSleep
Volume38
Issue10
Pagination1515-22
Date Published2015 Oct 01
ISSN1550-9109
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Community Health Services, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Educational Status, employment, Female, Health, Health Surveys, Heart Diseases, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Puerto Rico, Self Report, sleep, Social Class, Time Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: To define the prevalence of poor sleep patterns in the US Hispanic/Latino population, identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of short and long sleep duration, and the association between sleep and cardiometabolic outcomes.DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis.SETTING: Community-based study.PARTICIPANTS: Adults age 18-74 y free of sleep disorders (n = 11,860) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos baseline examination (2008-2011).INTERVENTIONS: N/A.MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: The mean self-reported sleep duration was 8.0 h per night with 18.6% sleeping less than 7 h and 20.1% sleeping more than 9 h in age- and sex-adjusted analyses. Short sleep was most common in individuals of Puerto Rican heritage (25.6%) and the Other Hispanic group (27.4%). Full-time employment, low level of education, and depressive symptoms were independent predictors of short sleep, whereas unemployment, low household income, low level of education, and being born in the mainland US were independent predictors of long sleep. After accounting for sociodemographic differences, short sleep remained significantly associated with obesity with an odds ratio of 1.29 [95% confidence interval 1.12-1.49] but not with diabetes, hypertension, or heart disease. In contrast, long sleep was not associated with any of these conditions.CONCLUSIONS: Sleep duration is highly variable among US Hispanic/Latinos, varying by Hispanic/Latino heritage as well as socioeconomic status. These differences may have health consequences given associations between sleep duration and cardiometabolic disease, particularly obesity.

DOI10.5665/sleep.5036
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID26085298
PubMed Central IDPMC4576324
Grant ListKL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR001073 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R25 MD006853 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0031
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published