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Parity and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Among US Hispanic/Latina Women: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleParity and Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Among US Hispanic/Latina Women: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsVladutiu CJ, Siega-Riz AMaria, Sotres-Alvarez D, Stuebe AM, Ni A, Tabb KM, Gallo LC, Potter JNE, Heiss G
JournalCirc Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes
Volume9
Issue2 Suppl 1
PaginationS62-9
Date Published2016 Feb
ISSN1941-7705
KeywordsAdult, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cohort Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Parity, Pregnancy, Prevalence, Prospective Studies
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physiological adaptations occurring across successive pregnancies may increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular health outcomes in later life.METHODS AND RESULTS: The association between parity and metabolic syndrome was examined among 7467 Hispanic/Latina women of diverse backgrounds, aged 18 to 74 years, who participated in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) from 2008 to 2011. Metabolic syndrome components were defined according to American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute criteria and included abdominal obesity, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios (ORs) adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioral, and reproductive characteristics. At HCHS/SOL baseline, women reported none (21.1%), 1 (19.9%), 2 (25.7%), 3 (18.6%), 4 (8.8%), and ≥ 5 (5.9%) live births. When compared with women with 1 birth, those with 4 births had the highest odds of abdominal obesity (OR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-2.8) and overall metabolic syndrome (OR, 1.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.0) and those with ≥ 5 births had the highest odds of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR, 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.0) and elevated fasting glucose (OR, 1.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.4), after adjusting for age, background, education, marital status, income, nativity, smoking, physical activity, menopause, oral contraceptive use, hormone therapy, and field center. Further adjustment for percent body fat attenuated these associations. No associations were observed between parity and elevated triglycerides or high blood pressure.CONCLUSIONS: Higher parity is associated with an increased prevalence of selected components of the metabolic syndrome among Hispanic/Latina women in the US. High parity among Hispanics/Latinas with a high prevalence of abdominal obesity suggests high risk for metabolic dysregulation.

DOI10.1161/CIRCOUTCOMES.115.002464
Alternate JournalCirc Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes
PubMed ID26908862
PubMed Central IDPMC4829116
Grant ListN01-HC6533 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32-HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007055 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0209
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published