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Fatalism and hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in US Hispanics/Latinos: results from HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleFatalism and hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment and control in US Hispanics/Latinos: results from HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsGutierrez AP, McCurley JL, Roesch SC, Gonzalez P, Castañeda SF, Penedo FJ, Gallo LC
JournalJ Behav Med
Volume40
Issue2
Pagination271-280
Date Published2017 Apr
ISSN1573-3521
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Adult, awareness, Culture, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

Compared with non-Hispanic whites, US Hispanics/Latinos display similar hypertension prevalence, but lower awareness, treatment, and control. Sociocultural factors may affect these patterns. Fatalism, the belief that health is predetermined by fate, relates to poorer adoption of risk reducing health behaviors. We examined the association of fatalism with hypertension prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control among 5313 Hispanics/Latinos, ages 18-74, who were enrolled from four US communities in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. After accounting for socioeconomic status and acculturation in logistic regression analyses, higher fatalism was associated with increased odds of hypertension (OR 1.14, 95 % CI 1.02, 1.28). This association was non-significant when diabetes and other health-related covariates were statistically adjusted. Fatalism was not associated with hypertension awareness, treatment, or control. Findings suggest that the association of fatalism with hypertension may be due largely to its association with SES, acculturation, or related health conditions.

DOI10.1007/s10865-016-9779-x
Alternate JournalJ Behav Med
PubMed ID27501734
PubMed Central IDPMC5299064
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0358
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published