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Sex Differences in Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Hispanic/Latino Youth.

TitleSex Differences in Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Hispanic/Latino Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2016
AuthorsIsasi CR, Parrinello CM, Ayala GX, Delamater AM, Perreira KM, Daviglus ML, Elder JP, Marchante AN, Bangdiwala SI, Van Horn L, Carnethon MR
JournalJ Pediatr
Volume176
Pagination121-127.e1
Date Published2016 09
ISSN1097-6833
KeywordsAdolescent, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Metabolic Diseases, Obesity, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Sex Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of obesity and cardiometabolic risk in US Hispanic/Latino youth and examine whether there are disparities by sex in cardiometabolic risk factors.STUDY DESIGN: Study of Latino Youth is a population-based cross-sectional study of 1466 Hispanic/Latino youth (8-16 years old) who were recruited from 4 urban US communities (Bronx, NY, Chicago, IL, Miami, FL, and San Diego, CA) in 2012-2014. The majority of children were US-born (78%) and from low-income and immigrant families. Cardiometabolic risk factors were defined by the use of national age- and sex-specific guidelines.RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was 26.5%. The prevalence of class II-III obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia was high (9.7%, 16.5%, and 23.3%, respectively). The prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors increased with severity of obesity in both boys and girls. Boys had a greater prevalence of diabetes and of elevated blood pressure than girls (20.9% vs 11.8% and 8.5% vs 3.3%). In multivariable analyses, younger boys were more likely to have obesity class II-III than girls (OR 3.59; 95% CI 1.44-8.97). Boys were more likely to have prediabetes than girls (OR 2.02; 95% CI 1.35-3.02), and the association was stronger at older ages.CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors was high in this sample of Hispanic youth. Boys had a more adverse cardiometabolic profile compared with girls that may put them at higher risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Reasons for this disparity and the long-term clinical implications remain to be elucidated.

DOI10.1016/j.jpeds.2016.05.037
Alternate JournalJ Pediatr
PubMed ID27344220
PubMed Central IDPMC5003716
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0244
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published