Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Childhood Trauma and Adult Risk Factors and Disease in Hispanics/Latinos in the US: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

TitleChildhood Trauma and Adult Risk Factors and Disease in Hispanics/Latinos in the US: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsLlabre MM, Schneiderman N, Gallo LC, Arguelles W, Daviglus ML, Gonzalez F, Isasi CR, Perreira KM, Penedo FJ
JournalPsychosom Med
Volume79
Issue2
Pagination172-180
Date Published2017 Feb/Mar
ISSN1534-7796
KeywordsAdult, Adult Survivors of Child Adverse Events, Alcohol Drinking, Chronic Disease, Depression, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Prevalence, Psychological Trauma, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Smoking, Urban Population
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are implicated in diseases of adulthood. We report the prevalence of ACEs in Hispanics/Latinos in the US and their association with major risk factors and diseases in adulthood.METHODS: Data from the Sociocultural Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) were used. The Sociocultural Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is an epidemiological study conducted in four urban communities in the US: Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. The analytic sample comprised 5117 participants, ages 18 to 74 at baseline. Linear and logistic models, adjusted for sociodemographic factors, were used to examine associations of ACEs and risk factors (depressive symptoms, obesity, smoking, and alcohol use) and chronic disease (coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cancer); the latter were also adjusted for risk factors.RESULTS: Most participants (77.2%) experienced at least one ACE, and 28.7% experienced four or more. Adverse childhood experiences were common among all ancestry groups, with variability among them. Prevalence of four or more ACEs was higher among women than men (31.2% and 25.8%, respectively). Adverse childhood experiences were associated with depressive symptoms, body mass index, smoking, alcohol use, cancer, coronary heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but not asthma, diabetes, or stroke. Associations were not moderated by social support.CONCLUSIONS: Adverse childhood experiences are prevalent among US Hispanics/Latinos and are involved in disease in adulthood. The apparent higher prevalence of ACEs in US Hispanics/Latinos did not correspond with stronger associations with disease. Further studies are needed to identify factors that may moderate the associations of ACE with adult disease.

DOI10.1097/PSY.0000000000000394
Alternate JournalPsychosom Med
PubMed ID27606797
PubMed Central IDPMC5285322
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 CA060553 / CA / NCI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
RC2 HL101649 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0142
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published