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Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleNeighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsSimonelli G, Dudley KA, Weng J, Gallo LC, Perreira K, Shah NA, Alcantara C, Zee PC, Ramos AR, Llabre MM, Sotres-Alvarez D, Wang R, Patel SR
JournalSleep
Volume40
Issue1
Date Published2017 Jan 01
ISSN1550-9109
Keywordsactigraphy, Adolescent, Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Residence Characteristics, Risk Factors, Safety, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, United States, Violence, Young Adult
Abstract

Study Objectives: To evaluate whether an adverse neighborhood environment has higher prevalence of poor sleep in a US Hispanic/Latino population.Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 2156 US Hispanic/Latino participants aged 18-64 years from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Participants completed surveys of neighborhood environment including perceived safety, violence and noise, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and 7 days of wrist actigraphy.Results: In age and sex-adjusted analyses, short sleep, low sleep efficiency, and late sleep midpoint were all more prevalent among those living in an unsafe neighborhood. After adjustment for background, site, nativity, income, employment, depressive symptoms, and sleep apnea, the absolute risk of sleeping <6 hours was 7.7 (95% CI [0.9, 14.6]) percentage points greater in those living in an unsafe compared to a safe neighborhood. There were no differences in the prevalence of insomnia by level of safety or violence. Insomnia was more prevalent among those living in a noisy neighborhood. In adjusted analysis, the absolute risk of insomnia was 4.4 (95% CI [0.4, 8.4]) percentage points greater in those living in noisy compared to non-noisy neighborhoods.Conclusion: Using validated measures of sleep duration and insomnia, we have demonstrated the existence of a higher prevalence of short sleep and insomnia by adverse neighborhood factors. An adverse neighborhood environment is an established risk factor for a variety of poor health outcomes. Our findings suggest negative effects on sleep may represent one pathway by which neighborhood environment influences health.

DOI10.1093/sleep/zsw025
Alternate JournalSleep
PubMed ID28364454
PubMed Central IDPMC5804993
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL125748 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
K23 HL125923 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / WHI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD005231 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065234 / HC / WHI NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0283
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published