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Association of cardiovascular risk factors between Hispanic/Latino parents and youth: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.

TitleAssociation of cardiovascular risk factors between Hispanic/Latino parents and youth: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2017
AuthorsCarnethon MR, Ayala GX, Bangdiwala SI, Bishop V, Daviglus ML, Delamater AM, Gallo LC, Perreira K, Pulgaron E, Reina S, Talavera GA, Van Horn LH, Isasi CR
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume27
Issue4
Pagination260-268.e2
Date Published2017 04
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, diet, Dyslipidemias, exercise, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Parents, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: Hispanic/Latinos have a high burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors which may begin at young ages. We tested the association of CVD risk factors between Hispanic/Latino parents and their children.METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Youth study. Girls (n = 674) and boys (n = 667) aged 8 to 16 years (mean age 12.1 years) and their parents (n = 942) had their CVD risk factors measured.RESULTS: CVD risk factors in parents were significantly positively associated with those same risk factors among youth. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, diet and physical activity, obese parents were significantly more likely to have youth who were overweight (odds ratios [ORs], 2.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-4.76) or obese (OR, 6.16; 95% CI, 3.23-11.77) versus normal weight. Dyslipidemia among parents was associated with 1.98 higher odds of dyslipidemia among youth (95% CI, 1.37-2.87). Neither hypertension nor diabetes was associated with higher odds of high blood pressure or hyperglycemia (prediabetes or diabetes) in youth. Findings were consistent by sex and in younger (age <12 years) versus older (≥12 years) youth.CONCLUSIONS: Hispanic/Latino youth share patterns of obesity and CVD risk factors with their parents, which portends high risk for adult CVD.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2017.03.001
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID28476328
PubMed Central IDPMC5800774
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007426 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0402
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published