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Sleep Patterns and Hypertension Using Actigraphy in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSleep Patterns and Hypertension Using Actigraphy in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2018
AuthorsRamos AR, Weng J, Wallace DM, Petrov MR, Wohlgemuth WK, Sotres-Alvarez D, Loredo JS, Reid KJ, Zee PC, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Patel SR
JournalChest
Volume153
Issue1
Pagination87-93
Date Published2018 01
ISSN1931-3543
Keywordsactigraphy, Adolescent, Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, Sleep Wake Disorders, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between actigraphy-based measures of sleep and prevalent hypertension in a sample of US Latinos.METHODS: We analyzed data from 2,148 participants of the Sueño Sleep Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), who underwent 1 week of wrist actigraphy to characterize sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep fragmentation index, and daytime naps. Insomnia was defined as an Insomnia Severity Index ≥ 15. Hypertension was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis. Survey linear regression was used to evaluate the association of sleep measures with hypertension prevalence. Sensitivity analyses excluded participants with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events/h.RESULTS: The mean age was 46.3 ± 11.6 years, and 65% of the sample consisted of women. The mean sleep duration was 6.7 ± 1.1 hours. Thirty-two percent of the sample had hypertension. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnic background, site, and AHI, each 10% reduction in sleep efficiency was associated with a 7.5% (95% CI, -12.9 to -2.2; P = .0061) greater hypertension prevalence, each 10% increase in sleep fragmentation index was associated with a 5.2% (95% CI, 1.4-8.9; P = .0071) greater hypertension prevalence, and frequent napping was associated with a 11.6% greater hypertension prevalence (95% CI, 5.5-17.7; P = .0002). In contrast, actigraphy-defined sleep duration (P = .20) and insomnia (P = .17) were not associated with hypertension. These findings persisted after excluding participants with an AHI ≥ 15 events/h.CONCLUSIONS: Independent of sleep-disordered breathing, we observed associations between reduced sleep continuity and daytime napping, but not short sleep duration, and prevalent hypertension.

DOI10.1016/j.chest.2017.09.028
Alternate JournalChest
PubMed ID28970105
PubMed Central IDPMC5812757
Grant ListK24 HL127307 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR000461 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
L60 MD005231 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL098297 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0331
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
Manuscript Status: 
Published