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Gestational diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors and disease in U.S. Hispanics/Latinas in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).

TitleGestational diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors and disease in U.S. Hispanics/Latinas in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsPerera MJ, Reina SA, Elfassy T, Potter JNE, Alvarez DSotres, Simon MA, Isasi CR, Stuebe AM, Schneiderman N, Llabre MM
JournalWomen Health
Volume59
Issue5
Pagination481-495
Date Published2019 May-Jun
ISSN1541-0331
KeywordsAdult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cohort Studies, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes, Gestational, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Metabolic syndrome, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States, Waist Circumference, Young Adult
Abstract

To compare cardiovascular risk and disease prevalence in U.S. Hispanics/Latinas with and without a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Cross-sectional data from 2008 to 2011 were analyzed for 8,262 (305 with GDM history) parous women, aged 20-73 years, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Women with and without a history of GDM were compared on sociodemographic, cardiovascular risk factor, and disease data from standardized interviews and fasting blood tests, using chi-square tests, t-tests, and logistic regressions to determine odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CIs). Adjusting for covariates, compared to those without a history of GDM, women with a history of GDM were younger (M = 39.1 years [95 percent CI = 37.8, 41.6] vs. 45.5 years [95 percent CI = 44.9, 46.1]) and more likely to have health insurance (68.1 percent [95 percent CI = 60.3 percent, 76.0 percent] vs. 54.9 percent [95 percent CI = 52.8 percent, 57.1 percent]), had greater waist circumference (M = 102.3 cm, [95 percent CI = 100.2, 104.3] vs. 98.1 cm [95 percent CI = 97.4, 98.5]) and higher fasting glucose (116.0 mg/dL [95 percent CI = 107.8, 124.3] vs. 104.2 mg/dL [95 percent CI = 103.4, 105.1]), and had higher odds of having metabolic syndrome (OR = 1.7 [95 percent CI = 1.2, 2.6]) or diabetes (OR = 3.3 [95 percent CI = 2.2, 4.8]). Prevalences of heart and cerebrovascular disease were similar. GDM history was positively associated with diabetes but not with cardiovascular disease.

DOI10.1080/03630242.2018.1500415
Alternate JournalWomen Health
PubMed ID30040600
PubMed Central IDPMC6536260
Grant ListN01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR002737 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0430
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
Manuscript Status: 
Published