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Food Insecurity Among Hispanic/Latino Youth: Who Is at Risk and What Are the Health Correlates?

TitleFood Insecurity Among Hispanic/Latino Youth: Who Is at Risk and What Are the Health Correlates?
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsPotochnick S, Perreira KM, Bravin JI, Castañeda SF, Daviglus ML, Gallo LC, Isasi CR
JournalJ Adolesc Health
Volume64
Issue5
Pagination631-639
Date Published2019 05
ISSN1879-1972
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Anxiety, Body mass index, Child, Depression, diet, Family Characteristics, Female, Food Supply, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Prevalence, Risk Factors, social support, Socioeconomic Factors, United States
Abstract

PURPOSE: We examined the correlates and health implications of household food insecurity among Hispanic/Latino youth (aged 8-16 years), a high food insecurity-risk population.METHODS: Using the Hispanic Community Children's Health/Study of Latino Youth (n = 1,362) and bivariate and multivariate analyses, we examined the correlates of household and child food insecurity and very low food security. We assessed the influence of four sets of risk/protective factors-child demographic, acculturation, socioeconomic, and family/social support. We then examined associations between food insecurity and four health indicators-body mass index, diet quality, depression, and anxiety-and used modification effects to assess whether these associations differed by sex, age, household income, parent nativity, and acculturative stress levels.RESULTS: We found high rates of food insecurity: 42% of Hispanic/Latino youth experienced household food insecurity and 33% child food insecurity. Moreover, 10% lived in a very low food secure household. Compared with their food secure peers, Hispanic/Latino youth in food insecure households experienced greater parent/child acculturative and economic stress and weakened family support systems. Associations of food insecurity with health outcomes varied by sex, age, household income, parent nativity, and child acculturative stress levels.CONCLUSIONS: Food insecurity is highly prevalent among Hispanic/Latino youth and has detrimental health implications, especially for girls, older youth, and youth experiencing acculturative stress. Reducing food insecurity and improving health among Hispanic/Latino youth will likely require comprehensive policies that address their multiple migration, familial, and economic stressors.

DOI10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.10.302
Alternate JournalJ Adolesc Health
PubMed ID30711363
PubMed Central IDPMC6492618
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0633
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published