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The Independent and Interactive Associations of Bilingualism and Sex on Cognitive Performance in Hispanics/Latinos of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleThe Independent and Interactive Associations of Bilingualism and Sex on Cognitive Performance in Hispanics/Latinos of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2019
AuthorsLamar M, León A, Romo K, Durazo-Arvizu RA, Sachdeva S, Lipton RB, Perreira KM, Gallo LC, Cai J, Khambaty T, Carrasco J, Llabre MM, Eyler LT, Daviglus ML, González HM
JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
Volume71
Issue4
Pagination1271-1283
Date Published2019
ISSN1875-8908
KeywordsCognition, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Memory, Middle Aged, Multilingualism, Neuropsychological Tests, Public Health, Sex Factors, United States, Verbal Learning
Abstract

Sixty percent of Hispanics/Latinos are bilingual which research suggests may confer certain cognitive advantages. Female sex confers cognitive advantages in verbal learning and memory compared to male sex, regardless of race or ethnicity. Understanding the independent and interactive associations of bilingualism and sex with cognition may aid in predicting cognitive aging in Hispanics/Latinos. We examined baseline (2008-2011) data from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a multicenter, prospective community-based study. Our analyses included 6,110 males and females ≥45 years old who self-reported birth and parents' origin outside of the continental US, Spanish as their first language, and were evaluated in Spanish. Bilingualism was assessed along a Likert scale (1 = only Spanish to 4 = English>Spanish) for language proficiency (reading/spoken) and patterns of use (thinking/socializing). Cognitive testing included verbal learning, memory, fluency, and Digit Symbol Substitution (DSS). Linear regression models adjusted for relevant confounders, the complex survey design, and sampling weights. Participants' self-reported language proficiency was Spanish better than English, while patterns of use suggested more Spanish than English. Higher language proficiency was associated with higher performance on all cognitive indices while higher patterns of use associated with higher fluency and DSS scores (p-values < 0.01). Female sex was associated with higher performance on all cognitive indices (p-values < 0.05). There were no significant interactions with bilingualism (regardless of metric) by sex on cognition. For Hispanics/Latinos residing in the continental US and reporting birth and parents' origin elsewhere, bilingualism and female sex have independent cognitive benefits that are important to consider when evaluating cognitive performance.

DOI10.3233/JAD-190019
Alternate JournalJ Alzheimers Dis
PubMed ID31524155
PubMed Central IDPMC8050701
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0572
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Chicago (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Manuscript Status: 
Published