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Sleep and neurocognitive decline in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSleep and neurocognitive decline in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsRamos AR, Tarraf W, Wu B, Redline S, Cai J, Daviglus ML, Gallo L, Mossavar-Rahmani Y, Perreira KM, Zee P, Zeng D, González HM
JournalAlzheimers Dement
Volume16
Issue2
Pagination305-315
Date Published2020 02
ISSN1552-5279
KeywordsAged, Central America, Cognitive Dysfunction, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Public Health, Puerto Rico, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders, Sleep Wake Disorders, South America, Surveys and Questionnaires, Time Factors
Abstract

INTRODUCTION: To determine if sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration predict seven-year neurocognitive decline in US Hispanics/Latinos (N = 5247).METHODS: The exposures were baseline SDB, daytime sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep duration. The outcomes were change in episodic learning and memory (B-SEVLT-Sum and SEVLT-Recall), language (word fluency [WF]), processing speed (Digit Symbol Substitution), and a cognitive impairment screener (Six-item Screener [SIS]).RESULTS: Mean age was 63 ± 8 years, with 55% of the population being female with 7.0% Central American, 24.5% Cuban, 9.3% Dominican, 35.9% Mexican, 14.4% Puerto Rican, and 5.1% South American background. Long sleep (>9 hours), but not short sleep (<6 hours), was associated with decline (standard deviation units) in episodic learning and memory (β -0.22 [se = 0.06]; P < .001; β = -0.13 [se = 0.06]; P < .05), WF (Pwf = -0.20 [se 5 0.06]; P < .01), and SIS (β = -0.16 [se = 0.06]; P < .01), but not processing speed, after adjusting for covariates. SDB, sleepiness, and insomnia were not associated with neurocognitive decline.CONCLUSION: Long sleep duration predicted seven-year cognitive decline.

DOI10.1016/j.jalz.2019.08.191
Alternate JournalAlzheimers Dement
PubMed ID31606367
PubMed Central IDPMC7007834
Grant ListP30 ES010126 / ES / NIEHS NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG059299 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG010220 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG056952 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG055527 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
P50 AG005131 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG061022 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG054548 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0696
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
Manuscript Status: 
Published