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Retaining Hispanics: Lessons From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleRetaining Hispanics: Lessons From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsPerreira KM, Abreu Mde Los Ang, Zhao B, Youngblood ME, Alvarado C, Cobo N, Crespo-Figueroa M, Garcia ML, Giachello AL, Pattany MS, Talavera AC, Talavera GA
JournalAm J Epidemiol
Volume189
Issue6
Pagination518-531
Date Published2020 06 01
ISSN1476-6256
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Community-Based Participatory Research, Cultural Competency, Female, health status, Hispanic Americans, Humans, language, Male, mental health, Middle Aged, Motivation, Patient Dropouts, Patient Satisfaction, Peer Review, Research, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Public Health, Research Subjects, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

We aimed to examine the retention of Hispanics/Latinos participating in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL), a prospective cohort study of 16,415 adults in 4 US cities who were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. We summarized retention strategies and examined contact, response, and participation rates over 5 years of annual follow-up interviews. We then evaluated motivations for participation and satisfaction with retention efforts among participants who completed a second in-person interview approximately 6 years after their baseline interview. Finally, we conducted logistic regression analyses estimating associations of demographic, health, and interview characteristics at study visit 1 (baseline) with participation, high motivation, and high satisfaction at visit 2. Across 5 years, the HCHS/SOL maintained contact, response, and participation rates over 80%. The most difficult Hispanic/Latino populations to retain included young, single, US-born males with less than a high school education. At visit 2, we found high rates of motivation and satisfaction. HCHS/SOL participants primarily sought to help their community and learn more about their health. High rates of retention of Hispanics/Latinos can be facilitated through the employment of bilingual/bicultural staff and the development of culturally tailored retention materials.

DOI10.1093/aje/kwaa003
Alternate JournalAm J Epidemiol
PubMed ID31971236
PubMed Central IDPMC7523586
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002489 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0524
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
Manuscript Status: 
Published