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Social capital and periodontal disease in Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSocial capital and periodontal disease in Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsLaniado N, Badner VM, Sanders AE, Singer RH, Finlayson TL, Hua S, Kaste LM, Isasi CR
JournalJ Clin Periodontol
Volume47
Issue5
Pagination542-551
Date Published2020 05
ISSN1600-051X
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Public Health, Risk Factors, Social Capital, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

AIMS: To examine the association of social capital with periodontal disease severity.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analysed data obtained from 3,994 men and women aged 18-74 years in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study (HCHS/SOL SCAS). From 2008 to 2011, dentists assessed periodontitis status with a full-mouth periodontal examination. Periodontitis was classified using standardized case definitions. Multivariable logistic regression estimated odds of moderate-severe periodontitis associated with two measures of social capital: structural support (Social Network Index) and functional support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List).RESULTS: For US-born participants, for each additional person in their social network, the adjusted odds of moderate-severe periodontitis was reduced 17% (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71, 0.96). However, no association was found between functional support and periodontal disease severity.CONCLUSIONS: Greater structural social support was associated with a lower prevalence of moderate-severe periodontitis in US-born Hispanics/Latinos. These findings suggest that US-born Hispanics/Latinos with less social support represent a vulnerable segment of the population at high-risk group for periodontal disease.

DOI10.1111/jcpe.13262
Alternate JournalJ Clin Periodontol
PubMed ID31998991
Grant ListN01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0817
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Bronx (Einstein College of Medicine)
Manuscript Status: 
Published