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Diabetes, Cognitive Decline, and Mild Cognitive Impairment Among Diverse Hispanics/Latinos: Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging Results (HCHS/SOL).

TitleDiabetes, Cognitive Decline, and Mild Cognitive Impairment Among Diverse Hispanics/Latinos: Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging Results (HCHS/SOL).
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsGonzález HM, Tarraf W, González KA, Fornage M, Zeng D, Gallo LC, Talavera GA, Daviglus ML, Lipton RB, Kaplan R, Ramos AR, Lamar M, Cai J, DeCarli C, Schneiderman N
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume43
Issue5
Pagination1111-1117
Date Published2020 05
ISSN1935-5548
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, aging, California, Chicago, Cognitive Aging, Cognitive Dysfunction, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Florida, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, New York, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic/racial group in the U.S., have the highest prevalence of diabetes, and are at increased risk for neurodegenerative disorders. Currently, little is known about the relationship between diabetes and cognitive decline and disorders among diverse Hispanics/Latinos. The purpose of this study is to clarify these relationships in diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Study of Latinos-Investigation of Neurocognitive Aging (SOL-INCA) is an ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). HCHS/SOL is a multisite (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; and San Diego, CA), probability-sampled (i.e., representative of targeted populations), and prospective cohort study. Between 2016 and 2018, SOL-INCA enrolled diverse Hispanics/Latinos aged ≥50 years ( = 6,377). Global cognitive decline and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) were the primary outcomes.RESULTS: Prevalent diabetes at visit 1, but not incident diabetes at visit 2, was associated with significantly steeper global cognitive decline (β = -0.16 [95% CI -0.25; -0.07]; < 0.001), domain-specific cognitive decline, and higher odds of MCI (odds ratio 1.74 [95% CI 1.34; 2.26]; < 0.001) compared with no diabetes in age- and sex-adjusted models.CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes was associated with cognitive decline and increased MCI prevalence among diverse Hispanics/Latinos, primarily among those with prevalent diabetes at visit 1. Our findings suggest that significant cognitive decline and MCI may be considered additional disease complications of diabetes among diverse middle-aged and older Hispanics/Latinos.

DOI10.2337/dc19-1676
Alternate JournalDiabetes Care
PubMed ID32139382
PubMed Central IDPMC7171942
Grant ListP30 AG059299 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002550 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
P60 DK020541 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
R21 AG056952 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
R01 AG048642 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG061022 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 AG062429 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
RF1 AG054548 / AG / NIA NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0596
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Neurocognitive Reading Center
Manuscript Status: 
Published