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Incidence of Hypertension Among US Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, 2008 to 2017.

TitleIncidence of Hypertension Among US Hispanics/Latinos: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, 2008 to 2017.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsElfassy T, Hazzouri AZeki Al, Cai J, Baldoni PL, Llabre MM, Rundek T, Raij L, Lash JP, Talavera GA, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Daviglus M, Booth JN, Castañeda SF, Garcia M, Schneiderman N
JournalJ Am Heart Assoc
Volume9
Issue12
Paginatione015031
Date Published2020 06 16
ISSN2047-9980
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, Antihypertensive Agents, blood pressure, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Race Factors, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Time Factors, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

Background Among US Hispanics/Latinos, the largest ethnic minority population in the United States, hypertension incidence has not been thoroughly reported. The goal of this study was to describe the incidence of hypertension among US Hispanic/Latino men and women of diverse Hispanic/Latino background. Methods and Results We studied 6171 participants of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, a diverse group of self-identified Hispanics/Latinos from 4 US urban communities, aged 18 to 74 years, and free from hypertension in 2008 to 2011 and re-examined in 2014 to 2017. Hypertension was defined as self-reported use of anti-hypertension medication, or measured systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg, or diastolic blood pressure ≥80 mm Hg. Results were weighted given the complex survey design to reflect the target population. Among men, the 6-year age-adjusted probability of developing hypertension was 21.7% (95% CI, 19.5-24.1) and differed by Hispanic/Latino background. Specifically, the probability was significantly higher among men of Cuban (27.1%; 95% CI, 20.2-35.2) and Dominican (28.1%; 95% CI, 19.5-38.8) backgrounds compared with Mexican Americans (17.6%; 95% CI: 14.5-21.2). Among women, the 6-year age-adjusted probability of developing hypertension was 19.7% (95% CI, 18.1-21.5) and also differed by Hispanic/Latino background. Specifically, the probability was significantly higher among women of Cuban (22.6%; 95% CI, 18.3-27.5), Dominican (23.3%; 95% CI, 18.0-29.5), and Puerto Rican (28.2%; 95% CI, 22.7-34.4) backgrounds compared with Mexican Americans (16.0%; 95% CI, 13.9-18.4). Conclusions Hypertension incidence varies by Hispanic/Latino background, with highest incidence among those of Caribbean background.

DOI10.1161/JAHA.119.015031
Alternate JournalJ Am Heart Assoc
PubMed ID32476602
PubMed Central IDPMC7429033
Grant ListK01 MD014158 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
KL2 TR002737 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0552
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: Miami (University of Miami)
Manuscript Status: 
Published