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Associations of sleep duration and social jetlag with cardiometabolic risk factors in the study of Latino youth.

TitleAssociations of sleep duration and social jetlag with cardiometabolic risk factors in the study of Latino youth.
Publication TypePublication
Year2020
AuthorsJohnson DA, Reid M, Vu T-HT, Gallo LC, Daviglus ML, Isasi CR, Redline S, Carnethon M
JournalSleep Health
Volume6
Issue5
Pagination563-569
Date Published2020 10
ISSN2352-7226
KeywordsAdolescent, Cardiometabolic Risk Factors, Child, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Jet Lag Syndrome, Male, sleep, Time Factors
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We investigated associations of sleep duration and social jetlag with cardiometabolic outcomes.PARTICIPANTS: Boys and girls aged 8-16 years from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latino Youth.MEASUREMENTS: Participants (n = 1,208) completed a clinical examination where anthropometric characteristics, health behaviors, and health history were measured. Sleep duration was calculated as the weighted average of self-reported weekday and weekend bedtimes and wake times and categorized into age-specific cutoffs for short vs. normal sleep. "Social jetlag" was defined as the absolute difference in the midpoint of the sleep period between weekdays and weekends, measured continuously and dichotomized (≥2 hours), with higher values indicating more displacement of sleep timing across the week. Regression models tested the associations between sleep measures (separately) and cardiometabolic outcomes (e.g., healthy eating index [0-100], physical activity-minutes per week, obesity, diabetes, hypertension) after adjustment for covariates.RESULTS: The average sleep duration was 9.5 hours (95% confidence interval: 9.3, 9.6) and the mean social jetlag was 2.5 (2.4, 2.7) hours. Participants with social jetlag reported more physical activity (β = 34.8 [13.14], P < .01), had a higher healthy eating index (β = 1.77 [0.87], P < .05] and lower odds of being overweight [OR = 0.66, (95% confidence interval 0.44, 0.99)]. Short sleep duration was associated with less physical activity but did not relate to other cardiometabolic outcomes.CONCLUSIONS: Social jetlag was associated with healthier behaviors and a lower odds of being overweight. Given these mixed findings, future research should further evaluate how to best characterize sleep timing differences in youth to identify health consequences.

DOI10.1016/j.sleh.2020.02.017
Alternate JournalSleep Health
PubMed ID32335037
PubMed Central IDPMC7577944
Grant ListL60 MD013236 / MD / NIMHD NIH HHS / United States
K01 HL138211 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R35 HL135818 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
UL1 TR002550 / TR / NCATS NIH HHS / United States
R01 HL102130 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
T32 HL007901 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P30 DK111022 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0549
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
HCHS/SOL Baseline Visit - Sleep Center - Harvard Medical School/The Brigham & Women's Hospital
ECI: 
Yes
Manuscript Status: 
Published