Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Design and implementation of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleDesign and implementation of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2010
AuthorsSorlie PD, Avilés-Santa LM, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Kaplan RC, Daviglus ML, Giachello AL, Schneiderman N, Raij L, Talavera G, Allison M, Lavange L, Chambless LE, Heiss G
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume20
Issue8
Pagination629-41
Date Published2010 Aug
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAcculturation, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, California, Chicago, Community Health Centers, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Financial Support, Florida, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, New York City, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL) is a comprehensive multicenter community based cohort study of Hispanics/Latinos in the United States.METHODS: The Study rationale, objectives, design, and implementation are described in this report.RESULTS: The HCHS/SOL will recruit 16,000 men and women who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino, 18 to 74 years of age, from a random sample of households in defined communities in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. The sites were selected so that the overall sample would consist of at least 2000 persons in each of the following origin designations: Mexican, Puerto Rican and Dominican, Cuban, and Central and South American. The study includes research in the prevalence of and risk factors for heart, lung, blood and sleep disorders, kidney and liver function, diabetes, cognitive function, dental conditions, and hearing disorders.CONCLUSIONS: The HCHS/SOL will (1) characterize the health status and disease burden in the largest minority population in the United States; (2) describe the positive and negative consequences of immigration and acculturation of Hispanics/Latinos to the mainstream United States life-styles, environment and health care opportunities; and (3) identify likely causal factors of many diseases in a population with diverse environmental exposures, genetic backgrounds, and early life experiences.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.03.015
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID20609343
PubMed Central IDPMC2904957
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
Z99 HL999999 / / Intramural NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0001
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
Manuscript Status: 
Published