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Prevalence of hypertension, awareness, treatment, and control in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitlePrevalence of hypertension, awareness, treatment, and control in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2014
AuthorsSorlie PD, Allison MA, M Avilés-Santa L, Cai J, Daviglus ML, Howard AG, Kaplan R, Lavange LM, Raij L, Schneiderman N, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Talavera GA
JournalAm J Hypertens
Volume27
Issue6
Pagination793-800
Date Published2014 Jun
ISSN1941-7225
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, awareness, blood pressure, Female, Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Hypertension, Hypoglycemic Agents, Male, Medically Uninsured, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The prevention and control of hypertension is an essential component for reducing the burden of cardiovascular diseases. Here we describe the prevalence of hypertension in diverse Hispanic/Latino background groups and describe the proportion who are aware of their diagnosis, receiving treatment, and having their hypertension under control.METHODS: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos is a longitudinal cohort study of 16,415 Hispanics/Latinos, aged 18-74 years from 4 US communities (Bronx, NY; Chicago, IL; Miami, FL; and San Diego, CA). At baseline (2008-2011) the study collected extensive measurements and completed questionnaires related to research on cardiovascular diseases. Hypertension was defined as measured blood pressure ≥140/90mm Hg or use of antihypertensive medication.RESULTS: The total age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in this study was 25.5% as compared with 27.4% in non-Hispanic whites in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Prevalence of hypertension increased with increasing age groups and was highest in Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Dominican background groups. The percent with hypertension who were aware, being treated with medication, or had their hypertension controlled was lower compared with US non-Hispanic whites with hypertension and it was lowest in those without health insurance.CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate a significant deficit in treatment and control of hypertension among Hispanics/Latinos residing in the United States, particularly those without health insurance. Given the relative ease of identification of hypertension and the availability of low-cost medications, enabling better access to diagnostic and treatment services should reduce the burden of hypertension in Hispanic populations.

DOI10.1093/ajh/hpu003
Alternate JournalAm J Hypertens
PubMed ID24627442
PubMed Central IDPMC4017932
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
P2C HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0020
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
NHLBI - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI is the lead NIH sponsor & Project Office for HCHS)
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published