Accessibility issues or difficulties with this website?
Call 919-962-2073 or email hchsadministration@unc.edu.

Sample design and cohort selection in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.

TitleSample design and cohort selection in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Publication TypePublication
Year2010
AuthorsLavange LM, Kalsbeek WD, Sorlie PD, Avilés-Santa LM, Kaplan RC, Barnhart J, Liu K, Giachello A, Lee DJ, Ryan J, Criqui MH, Elder JP
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume20
Issue8
Pagination642-9
Date Published2010 Aug
ISSN1873-2585
KeywordsAdolescent, Adult, Aged, California, Chicago, Cohort Studies, Community Health Centers, Emigration and Immigration, Female, Financial Support, Florida, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Middle Aged, New York City, Prospective Studies, Research Design, Risk Factors, Sampling Studies, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult
Abstract

PURPOSE: The Hispanic Community Health Study (HCHS)/Study of Latinos (SOL) is a multicenter, community-based cohort study of Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States. A diverse participant sample is required that is both representative of the target population and likely to remain engaged throughout follow-up. The choice of sample design, its rationale, and benefits and challenges of design decisions are described in this study.METHODS: The study design calls for recruitment and follow-up of a cohort of 16,000 Hispanics/Latinos 18-74 years of age, with 62.5% (10,000) over 44 years of age and adequate subgroup sample sizes to support inference by Hispanic/Latino background. Participants are recruited in community areas surrounding four field centers in the Bronx, Chicago, Miami, and San Diego. A two-stage area probability sample of households is selected with stratification and oversampling incorporated at each stage to provide a broadly diverse sample, offer efficiencies in field operations, and ensure that the target age distribution is obtained.CONCLUSIONS: Embedding probability sampling within this traditional, multisite cohort study design enables competing research objectives to be met. However, the use of probability sampling requires developing solutions to some unique challenges in both sample selection and recruitment, as described here.

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2010.05.006
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID20609344
PubMed Central IDPMC2921622
Grant ListN01HC65236 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65235 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65237 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65234 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01 HC065233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65233 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01HC65237 / HL / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65234 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65236 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
R24 HD050924 / HD / NICHD NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65235 / HC / NHLBI NIH HHS / United States
MS#: 
0002
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Coordinating Center - Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center - UNC at Chapel Hill
ECI: 
Manuscript Status: 
Published