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Neighborhood Socioeconomic Deprivation and Depression Symptoms in Adults From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)

TitleNeighborhood Socioeconomic Deprivation and Depression Symptoms in Adults From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)
Publication TypePublication
Year2021
AuthorsHolmgren JL, Carlson JA, Gallo LC, Doede AL, Jankowska MM, Sallis JF, Perreira KM, Andersson LMC, Talavera GA, Castañeda SF, Garcia ML, Allison MA
JournalAm J Community Psychol
Date Published2021 Jun 25
ISSN1573-2770
Abstract

Socioeconomic factors appear to impact mental health conditions such as depression, but little is known about the relative and combined role of neighborhood and personal socioeconomic deprivation among Hispanics/Latinos. This study examined cross-sectional associations of neighborhood and personal socioeconomic deprivation with depression symptoms in a US Hispanic/Latino population from the San Diego Field Center of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (n = 3,851). Depression symptoms were assessed with the ten-item Centers for Epidemiological Studies in Depression Scale. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was a composite of eleven variables (e.g., neighborhood income, education, employment, household crowding). Greater personal socioeconomic deprivation based on education, income, and employment was generally associated with higher depression symptoms, including after adjusting for neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation. Greater neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was associated with higher depression symptoms in females but not males, but the association in females became non-significant when adjusting for personal socioeconomic deprivation. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation did not significantly interact with personal socioeconomic deprivation in relation to depression symptoms. The present findings support the association of personal socioeconomic status with mental health (indicated by depression symptoms) among Hispanic/Latino populations, whereas neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation did not relate to depression beyond the impact of personal indicators.

DOI10.1002/ajcp.12525
Alternate JournalAm J Community Psychol
PubMed ID34170007
Grant ListR01DK106209 / DK / NIDDK NIH HHS / United States
N01-HC65233 / / National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) /
N01-HC65234 / / University of Miami /
N01-HC65235 / / Albert Einstein College of Medicine /
N01-HC65236 / / Northwestern University /
N01-HC65237 / / San Diego State University /
MS#: 
0709
Manuscript Lead/Corresponding Author Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
ECI: 
Manuscript Affiliation: 
Field Center: San Diego (San Diego State University)
Manuscript Status: 
Published